Brenner awarded Ledlie Prize

first_imgMichael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been awarded the George Ledlie Prize by the President and Fellows of Harvard College.Brenner, who received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago in 1994 and came to Harvard in 2001 after six years as a faculty member in applied mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was praised for his creative research and his dedication to teaching and learning.“He is richly deserving of this award, not only for his stellar research on the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and engineering, but also for the equally compelling way he infuses his love for the subject to his work as a remarkable teacher and mentor,” said Venkatesh “Venky” Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy at SEAS and director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School.Over the past 10 years, Brenner’s research has focused primarily on theoretical modeling in physical sciences and engineering. Problems he has tackled include the breaking of fluid droplets, sonoluminescence (the production of light from very high-pressure gas bubbles in liquid), the sedimentation of small particles, and electrospinning (a materials technique for producing small fibers).Recently, Brenner has branched into an even broader spectrum of fields, from atmospheric chemistry (developing algorithms to accelerate simulations of global pollution) to materials science (understanding the limitations of self-assembly and pattern formation) and physiology (exploring voltage-gated ion channels and hemoglobin). With support from the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard, he has also explored how to limit the growth of biofilms and even used “simple math” to explain dramatic beak shape variation in Darwin’s finches.Brenner has been lauded for his teaching and mentorship several times before. He was named a Harvard College Professor in 2010, and in 2009 was given the inaugural Capers and Marion McDonald Award for Excellence in Mentoring and Advising at SEAS. He has been particularly instrumental in exposing undergraduates to the joys of applied mathematics through the course Applied Mathematics 50, in which he invites students to use unorthodox problems — such as the reproductive dilemma of humble fungi — as material for quantitative investigation.Grace Tiao ’08, in a profile of Brenner, wrote: “His lectures, in fact, resemble in pace and execution the projectile motion of flying spores. When he speaks about his favorite subject — interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving — his sentences pop and plunge. Brenner has a habit of stopping mid-predicate to allow the next thought to hurtle into the air.”He was also a driving force behind the wildly popular “Science and Cooking” General Education course at Harvard College, which he co-taught this year with SEAS colleague David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics, and a team of world-renowned chefs, instructors, and teaching fellows.“Michael has been a constant positive force for quantitative thinking — not simply limited to particular classes, but infused throughout the College curriculum,” said SEAS Dean Cherry A. Murray, John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences and professor of physics. “His ultimate goal is nothing less than repositioning applied mathematics as a way of thinking and transforming the concentration into a quantitative liberal arts degree. He makes applied mathematics inviting, engaging, and, for lack of a better word, hip.”As area dean for applied mathematics at SEAS, Brenner is working with Murray to radically overhaul and enhance the undergraduate and graduate curricula and to improve advising. Moreover, he is engaged with many of the key aspects of running the school, from student and faculty recruitment to student affairs to communications.In the words of Margaret Meaney, a graduate academic programs administrator at SEAS, “He is sympathetic to the work that staff do to support teaching efforts. He always gives praise for work that often goes unnoticed and always treats everyone as his equal.”The Ledlie Prize is awarded no more than once every two years to someone affiliated with the University who “since the last awarding of said prize has by research, discovery, or otherwise made the most valuable contribution to science, or in any way for the benefit of mankind.” Robert B. Woodward, the Morris Loeb Professor of Chemistry, was the first recipient in 1955. Other winners have included Judah Folkman, the Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery; Douglas Melton, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences; Gerald Gabrielse, the George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics; and most recently, Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan, Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics and of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Lene Hau, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics.last_img read more

Five key skills all successful fmcg buyers have

first_imgSource: The GrocerGreat buyers have an extensive knowledge of what’s on their competitor’s shelvesMarket awarenessSuccessful buyers have a genuine interest in their category and know exactly what’s going on in the market. They’ll read lots of trade magazines, know what their competitors are doing and have a good grasp on the effect their category decisions have on the wider market.They’re tasked with growing market share, so buyers for big retailers need to be aware of what’s happening within their category at the discounters and in the convenience market, too.There’s also the small matter of understanding what consumers want from a category and trying to anticipate their needs. Outside of market data, buyers also deal with spreadsheets for their promotional calendar, pricing, volume vs profit and forecasting, so strong excel skills are a must.And to top it off, all categories have a regular flow of NPD to be managed. Every new product will come with its own calendar of tasks to be completed.Sharp commercial acumenBuyers need to understand how to plan, manage and implement budgets. Not only should they be aware of their top line sales, but also their bottom line in the short and long term.They’re also joint business planning, considering the commercial outcomes for their retailer and suppliers – so a buyer has to have strong money management skills.Master negotiating skillsBuyers spend a lot of time sitting in front of suppliers. They need to be able to negotiate the best deals that work for both parties: that might mean convincing suppliers to provide marketing support, or asking them to shell out money for certain shelf space. It’s always a case of give and take, and a great buyer can use their influence to get the best outcome. Buyers who work in chilled categories also have to juggle the short shelf lives of productsThe ability to keep calm under pressureBuyers need to be incredibly fast decision makers. If their boss sets a target and there’s limited space on shelf, there’s no time for flapping. If the category is underperforming, buyers need to act quickly and make tough decisions to still make their KPIs.And on top of this, buyers working in chilled have to work even faster because of their products’ short shelf lives. Are you a buyer working in own-label?center_img Enter The Grocer’s Best of Own-Label Awards for free today and get the recognition you deserve. We’ll be crowning Best Own-Label Buyer, Best Own-Label Range and Best Own-Label Team among several other enviable titles. Check out the rest of the categories and enter for free here. They’re at the forefront of food and drink trends, they introduce exciting new flavour combinations that excite the masses and take part in endless tasting sessions. To the outside world it can look like buyers have one of the best jobs in the world. But, the reality is, there’s a lot more to the job than trying out new products.We spoke to Emilie Gregson from specialist fmcg recruitment agency Signature Career Management to find out the most important skills that all of the UK’s best fmcg buyers have in their arsenal.,Strong excel skills are important to keep track of promotional calendars and pricingStrong data and organisational skillsSomeone who can’t read and interpret data isn’t going to cut it as a buyer.Buyers can’t rely on suppliers to give them the market analysis they need to plan their category. Some suppliers might offer up unbiased reports, but others will only provide the figures they want a buyer to see. And buyers could be dealing with up to 50 different suppliers all telling them different things – it’s their job to cut through the noise and find the real story within the data. And startups won’t have any data at all.last_img read more

Two-man shamble results at Wellington Golf Club

first_imgChampionship Flight1st – Steve Gill – Scott Templeton,                     60-64=124                      $300 ea.2nd Tie – Austin George– Jack Courington,        60-64=124                      $133.25 ea.2nd Tie – Myles Miller – Chad Gill,                    62-62=124                      $133.25 ea.2nd Tie – Austin Renn – Nick Anderson,                       61-63=124                      $133.25 ea.A Flight1st – Nick Becker – Brian Peck                          66-67=133                      $300 ea.2nd – Doug Johnson – Steve Johnson                 65-68=133                      $225 ea.3rd Tie – Gary Richmond – Adam Ricke                        64-70=134                      $87.50 ea.3rd Tie – Brad Stocking – Bill Mott                    67-67=134                      $87.50 ea.B Flight1st – Logan Woodbridge – Jordan Dwyer                      65-69=134                      $300 ea.2nd Tie – Harry Ricke – Jerry Ricke                   67-67=134                      $225 ea.2nd Tie – Geoff Bain – Pat McCammon              68-70=138                      $175 ea.C Flight1st – Leander Greene – Galen Greene,               72-69=141                      $300 ea.2nd – Bill Butts – Mark Erickson,                                   71-71=142                      $225 ea.3rd Tie – Kyle Lake – Buddy McDonald                        74-69=143                      $87.50 ea.3rd Tie – Nate Cornejo – Shay Cornejo               71-72=143                      $87.50 ea.D Flight1st – Brady Short – Deitrek Gill,                                     73-71=144                      $300 ea.2nd – Chris Murphy – Gene Huck                       74-73=147                      $225 ea.3rd – J.R. Sorrels – Jerry Sorrels                                     73-79=152                      $175 ea. Submitted to Sumner Newscow – The following are results of the 2- Man Shamble for July 20-21, 2013 at the Wellington golf course:last_img read more