United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) Q32009 Presentation

first_imgUnited Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2009 presentation results for the third quarter.For more information about United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng)  2009 presentation results for the third quarter.Company ProfileUnited Bank of Africa Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria offering banking products and services to the personal, commercial and corporate sectors. The company provides a full-service product offering ranging from transactional accounts, overdrafts and mortgage finance to domiciliary deposits, treasury services, asset management services, bonds, money market deposits and risk management solutions. United Bank of Africa Plc supports the agricultural sector through an agricultural credit support scheme which includes agro processing, an outgrowers scheme, equipment and mechanisation scheme and a tree crops replacement scheme. Founded in 1948, the company  now has an extensive network of some 1 000 branches in the major towns and cities of Nigeria. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. United Bank of Africa Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Okomu Palm Oil Plc (OKOMUO.ng) Q32015 Interim Report

first_imgOkomu Palm Oil Plc (OKOMUO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Agricultural sector has released it’s 2015 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Okomu Palm Oil Plc (OKOMUO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Okomu Palm Oil Plc (OKOMUO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Okomu Palm Oil Plc (OKOMUO.ng)  2015 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileOkomu Palm Oil Plc manufacture and market Banga Palm Oil in Nigeria as well as a range of Noko 10 rubber bands. The company was established in 1976 as a Federal Government pilot project set up to rehabilitate oil palm production in Nigeria. At the time, the pilot project incorporated 15 589 hectares of which 12 500 hectares was planted with oil palms. In 1985, Okomu Palm Oil Plc installed a 1.5 tonne fresh fruit bunches/hour mill. The company was privatised in 1990 and has grown to become Nigeria’s leading oil palm company with some 14 000 hectares of land currently planted with palm oil trees and 8 000 hectares of rubber trees. By 2020, an additional 4 000 hectares of palm oil trees and 1 500 hectares of rubber trees will have been planted on the 33 000 hectares of private land owned by Okomu Palm Oil Plc. The company operates two 30-tonne/per hour oil mills and an additional two 30-tonne/per hour mills will be operational by 2020/21. Its technical partner, SOCFINAF (Luxemburg), has a 53.32% stake in the business. SOCFINAF (Luxemburg) was founded in 1912 and was the first industrial company to plant oil palm trees in Africa and Indonesia. Today, it has plantations and oil palm operations in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Cote D’Ivoire, Liberia, Nigeria, Cameroon, the DRC, Sao Time and Cambodia. Okomu Oil Palm Plc’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Okomu Palm Oil Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) Q12016 Interim Report

first_imgRHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu)  2016 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileRHT Holding Limited provides public transport services in Mauritius. The company has since diversified its service provision into real estate and property services as well as computer and general technological property services. RHT Holding Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius’ Development Enterprise Market.last_img

As EYE17 closes, ‘peacemakers’ make a path home

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Louise Bower says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC July 14, 2017 at 10:00 pm How infuriating that the Latin American teens could not get visas!! This just indicates again how this travel ban no-think policy impacts all sorts of people and situations in unwarranted ways.Louise Bower (Grandmother of an EYE participants) Dan krutz says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (3) By Lynette Wilson Posted Jul 14, 2017 Comments are closed. Episcopal Youth Event, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 15, 2017 at 9:44 am It sounds like another inspiring EYE, and I’m glad the EYE20 is planned for Latin America. It is sad that participants from that region weren’t able to join other youth as they addressed a Path to Peace. I hope this triennial event will be sustained for the future. Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL More than 1,300 teenagers gathered as the sun was setting at the Oklahoma City National Memorial on July 12 for a candlelight vigil. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Edmond, Oklahoma] As the sun began to set July 12 on Oklahoma City, Episcopal youth assembled by diocese and processed from St. Paul’s Cathedral four blocks south on North Robinson Avenue to the Oklahoma City National Memorial for a candlelight vigil.The vigil followed an earlier visit to the memorial’s museum, which traces the timeline beginning 30 minutes before the April 19, 1995, bombing that killed 168 people and wounded 680 others, through the 2001 execution of Timothy McVeigh.“The way that it’s set up, you move through time and it’s a stunning thing,” said Kiera Campbell, 16, an Episcopal Youth Event 2017 planning committee member from the Diocese of Olympia. “It’s amazing to see how a city pulled together and how a city was able to find peace in each other.”Thirteen hundred youth from 90 of the Episcopal Church’s 109 dioceses attended the 13th annual Episcopal Youth Event from July 10 to 14 at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, a 20-minute drive from downtown Oklahoma City. The Beatitudes, particularly Matthew 5:9 – “Blessed are the Peacemakers for they will be called children of God,” – inspired EYE17’s theme, “Path to Peace.” (Absent were some youth from Province IX, the Latin America- and Caribbean-based dioceses, who were denied visas into the United States.)Teenagers attending the Episcopal Youth Event 2017 in Edmond, Oklahoma, visited the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum on July 12. Here, they visit the Gallery of Honor, where photos of the 168 people, including 19 children, hang on the walls. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe night before the museum visit and vigil, bombing survivors shared their personal experiences with the youth during an on-campus plenary session. During the candlelight vigil, the youth sat cross-legged on the grass opposite 168 empty chairs – 19 smaller chairs for children – representing each of the victims. A reflecting pool set between two pillars marked 9:01 and 9:03 isolated the minute, 9:02 a.m., that the truck bomb exploded, destroying the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.It was the history, but more importantly, the human response and its lasting impact that Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny wanted the youth to experience. The bombing, he said, brought together the people of Oklahoma in a spirit of unity, in what became the “Oklahoma Standard,” that continues today.“If you come to Oklahoma and you become an Oklahoman [the story] becomes a part of who you are because in many ways it was a huge turning point, not only for Oklahoma City but for the state,” said Konieczny, a priest in Texas at the time of the bombing. “It was an unfortunate way for things to go, but it energized and brought to light all the good of the people in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma… and it didn’t stop.”Photos of the victims hang in the Gallery of Honor, the last exhibit, at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceEven though the youth weren’t yet born in 1995 – they range in age from 13 to 18 – they live in an increasingly violent world. For that reason, Konieczny wanted to co-host EYE17 in his diocese and share Oklahoma City’s story as an example of peace and resilience.“The event is relevant because it helps them see all of the other things that happen in our world and our society and the other incidences of violence that take place, Columbine or Virginia Tech or Florida. It seems like every day there is something else, some big, some minor,” he said. “I hope the story is that we as a society have to do something about this. And they have the ability to do that … The message of this is not going to be the bomb. The message of this is life, and that we are going to put our faith where our faith needs to be, and we are going to stand up for justice and say, no, we are not going to live this way, we’re going to do something different.”Responding to violence and hatred with love was packed into the Path to Peace message.“The reality is that hatred doesn’t work and violence doesn’t work. Human beings were made by love, because I believe that God is love, and we were made to love and life only works when we love. And this memorial is a painful reminder that hatred hurts and harms, and we weren’t made for that,” said Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, at the site of the memorial. “We’ve been put on this earth to find a better way. To find life and love for everybody, and so coming to this memorial and being here this day is an opportunity to be reconsecrated and rededicated to creating a world where love rules.”There was some fun at EYE17. Here, the Rev. Tim Schenck, left, rector of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church in Hingham, Massachusetts, and the Rev. Scott Gunn, executive director of Forward Movement, sit by while Sierra Palmer of the Diocese of Kansas casts a vote for one of two saints. Saint Quiteria defeated Saint Longinus, 72 percent to 28 percent, and will be included in Lent Madness 2018. The rest of the saints in next year’s bracket will be announced in November. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceA year ago, the 16-member EYE17 youth planning committee visited Oklahoma City and the museum and memorial, to get a sense of what their peers would experience. Immediately, it was clear that Oklahoma City’s story is one “everyone needs to hear,” said Andres Gonzalez Bonilla, 16, of the Diocese of Arizona, who served on liturgy and music planning team. The city’s response to an act of domestic terrorism is a “tragic, but beautiful, moving story.”The EYE mission planning team began imaging the event 18 months ago, based on Matthew’s scripture and the Beatitudes, said Bronwyn Clark Skov, the Episcopal Church’s director of formation, youth and young adults, who oversees youth ministry.“We are very much taken with that entire package, but also because of what has been happening in the world, we really honed in on ‘blessed are the peacemakers,’” she said.The triennial youth event, a mandate of the church’s General Convention, drew 1,400 people in all, including 35 bishops, as well as chaperones, chaplains, medical and other volunteers. Every preacher, speaker, exhibitor and praxis session presented the theme in one way or another.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preached and presided during the opening Eucharist of EYE17. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceCurry preached during the July 11 opening Eucharist and later that day offered two back-to-back workshops on the “Jesus Movement,” followed by a question-and-answer period. Other speakers, including President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, bishops, Episcopal Church staff members, representatives from Episcopal Relief & Development, Forma, Episcopal Service Corps and others, offered workshops ranging from advocacy to nonviolent communication in a violent world to living in intentional communities as a path to peace.“I think that ‘Path to Peace’ has been articulated in many different ways during this event, and my hope is that it has been contagious enough so that when all of the young people who go home from this event start telling the story of what they experienced here and what they learned here that they will feel empowered to actually act upon their own good and right and God-gifted inclination to do something,” said Skov.During a press conference on July 11, Trevor Mahan of the Diocese of Kansas, a member of the planning committee, said the youth intentionally designed the event to introduce youth to church leadership and the wider Episcopal Church, offering ways to engage further at all levels.Mahan’s planning team colleague, Campbell, of the Diocese of Olympia, concurred.“We want people to be able to go back home and connect with other Episcopal organizations,” she said, and bring back the Path to Peace message to encourage other youth to become involved.Konieczny sees real hope in today’s young people, who are far more inclusive than previous generations. The makeup of EYE17, the most diverse group ever, attested to that.“As I said during my homily at the vigil, today’s young people can make a real difference in the world,” he said.“They are at that age now where they’re setting the stage for how their generation is going to live together, and you can already see the level of acceptance, inclusion and willingness to live in diversity and honor each other. And that’s not always been the case for generations that have gone before; it’s this is us, that’s them and let’s just keep our distance,” said Konieczny.Plans for EYE20 are underway, and with the help of a Constable Fund grant, the Episcopal Church plans to hold the event in Latin America.-Lynette Wilson is managing editor of Episcopal News Service. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Fred Garvin says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA EYE17 Rector Smithfield, NC As EYE17 closes, ‘peacemakers’ make a path home Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum leaves lasting impression  Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA July 17, 2017 at 9:28 am “This is the most diverse group ever”-well, considering the ethnic makeup of the Episcopal church, that’s not saying very much, is it?last_img read more

Tennessee bishop recruits neighboring colleague to implement same-sex marriage rites

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest General Convention 2018, Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Marriage Equality, By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 18, 2019 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Resolution B012, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Same-Sex Marriage In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tennessee bishop recruits neighboring colleague to implement same-sex marriage rites Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee Bishop John Bauerschmidt announced Jan. 18 that neighboring Bishop Brian Cole of East Tennessee will “provide pastoral support” to Tennessee couples, clergy and congregations who want to solemnize same-sex marriages.To begin that process, Bauerschmidt wrote in a two-page description of his policy, all canonically resident clergy in the diocese must notify him and assure him that the cleric’s congregation agrees to use of the trial rites for marriage.Bauerschmidt, who opposes same-sex marriage, said that “where there is disagreement in teaching about the sacramental rite of marriage between bishop and clergy there can be no effective oversight of marriage by the diocesan bishop.” Thus, another bishop must be available to “provide whatever episcopal support is needed for couples and clergy preparing for marriage.”Bauerschmidt said his policy applies whether the trial-use rites or any other marriage rite is used.Cole will handle the canonically required episcopal permission needed (Canon I.19.3 (page 60 here)) in what Bauerschmidt previously called the “extraordinary instance of the remarriage of a person with a previous spouse still living.”Bauerschmidt said that the two rites for marriage, which General Convention first authorized in 2015 for trial use by both same-sex and opposite-sex couples, cannot be used in mission and chaplaincy churches of which he is effectively the rector, or in facilities for which he is directly responsible.Before formulating his policy, the bishop issued two “pastoral teaching” essays, one on the bishop’s role and one on the “church’s traditional teaching on marriage.” At the end of his policy statement, Bauerschmidt reminded clergy of the “obligations undertaken at ordination, and the role of the bishop as chief pastor, and commended to them the teaching on marriage.The policy, he said in a letter that accompanied it, is “intended to promote the highest degree of communion and fellowship in a time of challenge for the church. These provisions require consultation. No document can answer every question in advance.”General Convention in 2015 said that the bishops of the church’s domestic dioceses needed to give their permission for the rites to be used or “make provision for all couples asking to be married in this church to have access to these liturgies.” (The Episcopal Church includes a small number of dioceses outside the United States in civil jurisdictions that do not allow marriage for same-sex couples.)There was widespread acceptance of the rites across the church. However, eight diocesan bishops in the 101 domestic dioceses did not authorized their use. Bauerschmidt was among those eight, as was Diocese of Albany Bishop William Love, Central Florida Bishop Greg Brewer, Dallas Bishop George Sumner, Florida Bishop John Howard, North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith, Springfield Bishop Dan Martins and Virgin Islands Bishop Ambrose Gumbs.The eight bishops required that couples wanting to use the rites be married outside their dioceses and away from their home churches. Some bishops, including Love, refused to allow priests in their diocese to use the rites anywhere.Last July, convention attempted to remedy to the situation by passing Resolution B012, which went into effect on the first Sunday of Advent, Dec. 2. Bishops and deputies moved the authority for deciding to use the rites from the diocesan bishop to parish priests.B012 said diocesan bishops who do not agree with same-sex marriage “shall invite, as necessary,” another Episcopal Church bishop to provide “pastoral support” to the couple, the clergy member involved and the congregation. Some of the eight bishops have interpreted B012 as requiring – or allowing them to require – the involvement of another bishop.Christopher Hayes, who as a deputy from California proposed the amended version that convention passed, has told Episcopal News Service that the key phrase is “as necessary.” Hayes thinks some bishops are misinterpreting that to mean “necessary” by mere fact of the bishops’ disagreement, whereas he understands it to mean pastorally necessary. Such pastoral necessity, he said, would be rare.B012 makes the rites available within every diocese of The Episcopal Church where civil law permits same-sex marriage.Shortly after convention, Bauerschmidt said B012 sets up “a particular structure that upholds the bishop’s unique role as chief pastor and teacher and presider at the liturgy,” even when the bishop cannot support same-sex marriage.Some Tennessee Episcopalians grew concerned when Dec. 2 came and went without a policy from Bauerschmidt. A group of more than 100 lay and ordained Tennessee Episcopalians connected with All Sacraments for All People wrote letters to Bauerschmidt and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on Jan. 7 to decry the former’s refusal to institute a policy for implementing B012. They noted that at least one couple and their priest have asked Bauerschmidt for guidance and were told to wait.“Other committed couples anxiously wait to make their vows before God surrounded by the communities who love and support them,” the group told Bauerschmidt.“We therefore are reluctantly notifying you of this delay in making the trial liturgies available in this diocese,” the signers told Curry.Love is the only one of the eight who initially refused to permit use of the rites who has flatly refused to conform to B012. On Jan. 11, Curry prevented him from punishing clergy, laity and congregations who wish to use the rite, and Curry has referred the matter for investigation through the church’s clergy discipline process. Love is appealing the restriction.Gumbs now has told his clergy to offer the rites without further obstacles. The other bishops, like Bauerschmidt, have said they intend to ask another bishop to assist when congregations ask to use the rites.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter.last_img read more

Coronavirus, ‘Plandemic’ and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

first_img TAGSConspiracyConspiratorial ThinkingCoronavirusPlandemicSeven TraitsThe Conversation Previous articleRep. Demings to support ‘The Heroes Act’, including $26 million for Apopka specificallyNext articleMeals of Love created in response to COVID-19, surpasses senior meal delivery projections Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. No matter the details of the plot, conspiracy theories follow common patterns of thought. Ranta Images/iStock/Getty Images Plus LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here By John Cook, Research Assistant Professor, Center for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University; Sander van der Linden, Director, Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab, University of Cambridge; Stephan Lewandowsky, Chair of Cognitive Psychology, University of Bristol, and Ullrich Ecker, Associate Professor of Cognitive Science, University of Western AustraliaThe conspiracy theory video “Plandemic” recently went viral. Despite being taken down by YouTube and Facebook, it continues to get uploaded and viewed millions of times. The video is an interview with conspiracy theorist Judy Mikovits, a disgraced former virology researcher who believes the COVID-19 pandemic is based on vast deception, with the purpose of profiting from selling vaccinations.The video is rife with misinformation and conspiracy theories. Many high-quality fact-checks and debunkings have been published by reputable outlets such as Science, Politifact and FactCheck.As scholars who research how to counter science misinformation and conspiracy theories, we believe there is also value in exposing the rhetorical techniques used in “Plandemic.” As we outline in our Conspiracy Theory Handbook and How to Spot COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories, there are seven distinctive traits of conspiratorial thinking. “Plandemic” offers textbook examples of them all.Learning these traits can help you spot the red flags of a baseless conspiracy theory and hopefully build up some resistance to being taken in by this kind of thinking. This is an important skill given the current surge of pandemic-fueled conspiracy theories.The seven traits of conspiratorial thinking.John Cook, CC BY-ND1. Contradictory beliefsConspiracy theorists are so committed to disbelieving an official account, it doesn’t matter if their belief system is internally contradictory. The “Plandemic” video advances two false origin stories for the coronavirus. It argues that SARS-CoV-2 came from a lab in Wuhan – but also argues that everybody already has the coronavirus from previous vaccinations, and wearing masks activates it. Believing both causes is mutually inconsistent.2. Overriding suspicionConspiracy theorists are overwhelmingly suspicious toward the official account. That means any scientific evidence that doesn’t fit into the conspiracy theory must be faked.But if you think the scientific data is faked, that leads down the rabbit hole of believing that any scientific organization publishing or endorsing research consistent with the “official account” must be in on the conspiracy. For COVID-19, this includes the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, Anthony Fauci… basically, any group or person who actually knows anything about science must be part of the conspiracy.3. Nefarious intentIn a conspiracy theory, the conspirators are assumed to have evil motives. In the case of “Plandemic,” there’s no limit to the nefarious intent. The video suggests scientists including Anthony Fauci engineered the COVID-19 pandemic, a plot which involves killing hundreds of thousands of people so far for potentially billions of dollars of profit.Conspiratorial thinking finds evil intentions at all levels of the presumed conspiracy.MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images4. Conviction something’s wrongConspiracy theorists may occasionally abandon specific ideas when they become untenable. But those revisions tend not to change their overall conclusion that “something must be wrong” and that the official account is based on deception.When “Plandemic” filmmaker Mikki Willis was asked if he really believed COVID-19 was intentionally started for profit, his response was “I don’t know, to be clear, if it’s an intentional or naturally occurring situation. I have no idea.”He has no idea. All he knows for sure is something must be wrong: “It’s too fishy.”5. Persecuted victimConspiracy theorists think of themselves as the victims of organized persecution. “Plandemic” further ratchets up the persecuted victimhood by characterizing the entire world population as victims of a vast deception, which is disseminated by the media and even ourselves as unwitting accomplices.At the same time, conspiracy theorists see themselves as brave heroes taking on the villainous conspirators.6. Immunity to evidenceIt’s so hard to change a conspiracy theorist’s mind because their theories are self-sealing. Even absence of evidence for a theory becomes evidence for the theory: The reason there’s no proof of the conspiracy is because the conspirators did such a good job covering it up.7. Reinterpreting randomnessConspiracy theorists see patterns everywhere – they’re all about connecting the dots. Random events are reinterpreted as being caused by the conspiracy and woven into a broader, interconnected pattern. Any connections are imbued with sinister meaning.For example, the “Plandemic” video suggestively points to the U.S. National Institutes of Health funding that has gone to the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China. This is despite the fact that the lab is just one of many international collaborators on a project that sought to examine the risk of future viruses emerging from wildlife.Learning about common traits of conspiratorial thinking can help you recognize and resist conspiracy theories.Critical thinking is the antidoteAs we explore in our Conspiracy Theory Handbook, there are a variety of strategies you can use in response to conspiracy theories.One approach is to inoculate yourself and your social networks by identifying and calling out the traits of conspiratorial thinking. Another approach is to “cognitively empower” people, by encouraging them to think analytically. The antidote to conspiratorial thinking is critical thinking, which involves healthy skepticism of official accounts while carefully considering available evidence.Understanding and revealing the techniques of conspiracy theorists is key to inoculating yourself and others from being misled, especially when we are most vulnerable: in times of crises and uncertainty. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment!last_img read more

Voluntary sector umbrella bodies campaign for EU Structural Funds

first_imgVoluntary sector umbrella bodies campaign for EU Structural Funds About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img National voluntary sector umbrella bodies throughout the UK are calling on European Union (EU) leaders to ensure that when the EU budget for the next seven years is agreed, it will not dramatically cut the levels of funding to the UK voluntary and community sector.The Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action (NICVA) together with the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO), the Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA), and the Third Sector European Network (TSEN) want to step up the campaign to combat poverty and social exclusion.They will launch a joint position paper, Towards a Vision for the Future of Structural Funds, at a reception in Belfast on Thursday 7 July, as EU employment and social affairs ministers gather – in the same city – for the first meeting of the UK Presidency of the EU. Advertisement Howard Lake | 30 June 2005 | Newslast_img read more

Children’s Society targets baby boomers in latest campaign

first_img  23 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Children’s Society targets baby boomers in latest campaign The Children’s Society is trialling a multi-channel appeal targeting baby boomers in the West Midlands region.The appeal goes live next week and will integrate direct mail, press ads, inserts and an online microsite designed by agency DMS. It aims to recruit people as Community Sponsors. Carolyne Coupel, head of direct marketing at the Children’s Society said: “The concept of Community Sponsorship sets us apart from other children’s charities as we focus on very localised issues and tap into the audience’s desire to rekindle a genuine sense of community.”Activity focuses on a local project – Safe in the City in Birmingham – and highlights genuine case studies from children in the area. The local programme manager is featured discussing local issues in a video clip on the microsite and those who sign up to be Community Sponsors will receive ongoing communications form the local projects.This is a test campaign for other UK regions.www.childrenssociety.org.uk Tagged with: baby boomers Digital Howard Lake | 24 October 2008 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Nomura chooses Rainbow Trust as charity of the year

first_imgNomura chooses Rainbow Trust as charity of the year AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Tagged with: charity of the year corporate Global investment bank Nomura has selected children’s charity Rainbow Trust as its charity of the year, in a partnership that will run for two years. The charity, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary, expects to receive more than £300,000 from the partnership.The charity was selected following an employee vote in April this year. Applications were received from 20 charities.Nomura’s community affairs programme, which supports young people in the UK, has recently completed a two year relationship with Teenage Cancer Trust in which employees raised £1 million, ten times its original fundraising target.Heather Wood, Chief Executive of Rainbow Trust said: “This is fantastic news for Rainbow Trust, and currently makes Nomura our biggest corporate supporter. I would like to say a big thank you to Nomura for choosing Rainbow Trust; this is a wonderful boost for the charity, expanding our reach by 20 per cent”.www.rainbowtrust.org.uk  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 23 May 2011 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

thankQ adds up for Severn Hospice

first_img Tagged with: ThankQ  53 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 21 September 2012 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Severn Hospice provides care for people with complex and progressive illnesses in the areas of Shropshire, Telford and Mid Wales. The Hospice provides all its services free of charge with the majority of its funding coming from voluntary sources, including public donations, the Hospice’s shops, lottery, events and legacies.Fundraising accounts for two thirds of the Severn Hospice’s annual income and the Hospice chose thankQ specifically because it allows the fundraising team to gain a 360 degree view of its supporters. It does this by linking directly with the Hospice’s lottery and retail systems and by integrating with the Hospice website, pulling all transaction data straight through to the thankQ database and building a comprehensive picture of the supporter community. Such a wealth of supporter data will enable the fundraising team to profile and segment their supporter community much more effectively. Severn Hospice will also be using thankQ’s powerful JustGiving module, which will enable the fundraising team to transfer donation and event data between thankQ and JustGiving at the touch of a button – and not just from individuals who are fundraising for the Hospice but also from those who are supporting them with donations.Severn Hospice will also benefit from thankQ’s advanced contact management functionality, which will be further enhanced by integration with facebook and twitter. So, not only will the Hospice have the opportunity to communicate with supporters via mail, email and sms, they will also be able to find out who has been talking to them and about them on social media sites, and engage with their supporters on these platforms.Severn Hospice is also planning to utilise thankQ dashboard reports to track and plan events, fundraising activities, mailing campaigns and much more besides.Maria Cameron, Appeals Manager for Severn Hospice told us, ‘the opportunities thankQ will bring to the organisation are almost too many to take in. We have a fantastic fundraising team here and we’re looking forward to the challenge of maximising every single opportunity that thankQ presents’. thankQ adds up for Severn Hospicelast_img read more