No surprise annual audits monthly reports says former NHIB Chair

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp #magneticmedianews #tcinhip  #drexwellseymour Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, November 28, 2016 – The National Health Insurance Board’s money woes should not be a surprise because the Health plan is audited annually and the Permanent Secretaries of Health and Finance sit in on meetings and are presented information to help their ministers make high level decisions and to be acquainted with what is or is not happening at NHIP.This information comes from former Chairman and HLB Owner and CPA, Drexwell Seymour who responded to questions from Magnetic Media after the bombshell news that the Health Insurance plan is bleeding funds to the tune of $6.1 million and needs an urgent $2 million bail out to save the plan from crashing.Seymour said PriceWaterhouseCoopers(PWC) conducts those audits and that the Board has managed to drastically reduce what government was spending on medical care from $40 million annually on locals only before the NHIP was established to now, $13 million dollars per year for locals and work permit holders.Seymour said monthly accounts are submitted and that Government should perhaps consider giving the NHIB more money to manage medical care as there is a shortfall or not enough money to take care of the health care demands.  You can read an article on the state of the NHIP from Drexwell Seymour’s perspective at his Facebook page.Magnetic Media’s report on Friday caused outrage among many residents who questioned leadership following news from a post Cabinet statement which called for a review of NHIB and said that Cabinet was surprised at the financial predicament of the social health care plan. Related Items:#drexwellseymour, #magneticmedianews, #tcinhipcenter_img PDM Administration announces budget increase for primary health care, goal to reduce overseas medical bills Recommended for youlast_img read more

May to rule out halfin EU deal

first_imgBritish Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a press conference. Photo: AFPBritish Prime Minister Theresa May on Tuesday is expected to say she favours a clean break from the European Union, dismissing a “half-in, half-out” Brexit deal with Brussels.In a highly-anticipated speech, May is likely to give further signals that Britain is heading to what analysts call a “hard” Brexit.That direction will be cheered by those who want to leave the EU, but dismay those who fear the impact on Britain’s economy.“Not partial membership of the European Union, associate membership of the European Union, or anything that leaves us half-in, half-out,” the prime minister is due to say on Tuesday, according to an extract of her speech circulated in advance to the media by Downing Street.“We do not seek to adopt a model already enjoyed by other countries. We do not seek to hold on to bits of membership as we leave,” she will add.The speech will take place late morning at Lancaster House, a central London mansion that is a showcase for diplomatic functions and major announcements.It will be dissected for every detail about May’s Brexit strategy, after months of uncertainty.May has repeated a “Brexit means Brexit” mantra-on one occasion replaced with her call for a “red, white and blue Brexit”-while claiming outlining the government’s aims in any detail would give Brussels the upper hand in negotiations.But recent indicators suggest Britain is heading towards a full break from the EU which entails leaving the single market in order to have full control over immigration.Downing Street has repeatedly said it wants to secure the best deal for the British economy while allowing for cuts to immigration.But the EU has been clear that single market access is dependent on allowing the free movement of people.The prospect of a “hard” Brexit has hit sterling.In early trading on Monday, the British currency plunged to $1.1986, its lowest level since October’s “flash crash” that had sent it to a 31-year low of $1.1841. It clawed back some of its losses by early afternoon, to $1.2047.Trump and trade dealBritain’s Finance minister Philip Hammond adopted a tough line on Sunday, warning that Britain might undercut the EU economically in order to remain competitive if it faces EU tariffs.Hammond said he wanted Britain to remain a “recognisably European-style economy with European-style taxation systems, European-style regulation systems.”However, London would have to change course “if we are forced”, in order to “regain competitiveness”, he told Germany’s Welt am Sonntag newspaper on Sunday.In recent weeks, May raised the possibility of a transitional deal with Brussels to ease Britain’s departure from the bloc, a position supported by Bank of England governor Mark Carney.Britain’s post-EU prospects were given a verbal boost on Sunday by US President-elect Donald Trump, who said he favoured a quick trade deal with the UK.But a fast-track bilateral deal with Washington will be difficult in practical terms.Under EU rules Britain cannot sign trade deals with third party states until it is formally outside the bloc, a position which does not change despite the UK voting to leave.A two-year negotiating period is foreseen in EU legislation for any country choosing to leave the 28-member bloc, a process which starts by triggering Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty.May has promised to formally launch Brexit talks by the end of March and the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has said there should be an agreement in place ahead of the European Parliament elections in 2019.But even if the prime minister’s plan outlined on Tuesday wins widespread support, legal challenges could still scupper her Brexit timetable.Britain’s Supreme Court is due to rule later this month on whether May must seek parliamentary approval before triggering Article 50, which could delay the start of Brexit negotiations.last_img read more

Labour union stops dispatch of first flush tea over unpaid dues

first_imgDarjeeling: The Himalayan Plantation Labour Union (HPWU), affiliated to the Gorkha National Liberation Front has stopped the dispatch of premium first flush manufactured tea from the Rangili-Rungliot tea estate in Darjeeling, protesting against the non-payment of dues to the tune of more than Rs 1.5 crore accumulated since 2011. “The management of the tea estate has not paid the second instalment of bonus as per agreement, along with other dues. Despite repeated requests the management has turned a deaf ear. We have stopped the dispatch of manufactured tea from the garden since April 14″, stated JB Tamang, general secretary of HPWU. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe dues include gratuity, provident fund, leave travel allowance, salary, wages, staff kitchen allowance, JCO and tea makers salary, medical bill and LTA of temporary workers.”Till February 14, 2018, the accumulated due was to the tune of Rs 1,45,76,481. Dues have continued accumulating since then. Gratuity has not been paid since 2011″, added Tamang.HPWU on Wednesday had submitted memorandums to the District Magistrate, Superintendent of Police and the Assistant Labour Commissioner of Darjeeling calling for legal action to be taken against the management. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”If the management pays the 2nd instalment of the bonus and part of the pending dues we will allow the dispatches. However, if they try to commence dispatch forcefully, we will stop the dispatch till the total due amount is paid up”, cautioned Sudesh Rai, branch president of HPWU.The union has made an appeal to other trade unions to join the agitation in order to create adequate pressure.The tea estate has 350 workers and around 100 staff and sub staff. It produces 1,60,000 kg of tea annually. The trade Union had earlier threatened to stop the dispatches of manufactured tea in all the 87 tea gardens, if the gardens fail to give the stipulated fringe benefits to the workers by April 21. “As per the Plantation Labour Act, workers working for 120 days in a year are entitled to fringe benefits. However, the management of the gardens is only providing fringe benefits to workers who have worked for at least 180 days. This needs to change. Till now, no tripartite meet has been called to resolve this issue. We will stop dispatch of tea in all the tea gardens in the Darjeeling hills from April 21 if our demands are not met”, threatened Tamang.last_img read more

3 Strategies for Taking a Bite out of the Booming App Market

first_img Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer 5 min read “There’s an app for that” used to be a tongue-in-cheek slogan in the iPhone’s early days. Now, it’s a fact of life: By 2020, it’s estimated that 6.1 billion people will rely on smartphones. Users will install 210 billion apps between now and then, a trend that will earn developers a collective $57 billion in revenue in 2020 alone.Related: 4 Ways a ‘Data-Driven’ Approach Anticipates Buyer BehaviorApps are quickly becoming a brand imperative. But going after downloads or in-app purchases isn’t enough anymore; those are just the beginning stages of a product’s life cycle. To make apps a part of long-term growth strategies, companies must evolve these products based on users’ behaviors.Every business needs an appThe app industry is big — and getting bigger — but the major proportion of the industry’s usage and revenue are still concentrated among the top 200 apps. Localytics found that 20 percent of apps are used only once. Consumers are far more likely to use Facebook, Twitter and YouTube than spend time exploring more novel smartphone products.A word-of-mouth campaign might draw users to a new app, but what happens when their initial curiosity wears off? If there’s nothing that repeatedly engages their attention, they’ll reopen Instagram or Snapchat, as fresh content from a reliable source will always beat the flashy new thing.Brands can’t rest on their laurels, then. They must constantly iterate on their apps to retain users. But launching occasional updates or announcing minor tweaks once a quarter isn’t enough. “Twenty-five new features” that no one wants won’t have as powerful an impact as the one key upgrade that aligns with users’ expectations and in-app behaviors.People have finite time and energy. They want to know that an app is worth their attention, so companies must make their value propositions clear. Perhaps your company can offer users a coupon for $10 off a new feature as a thank-you for creating their in-app profiles. Such incentives will keep the app top of mind so users return to it often. At that point, brands can track users’ behavioral patterns in order to deliver better customer experiences.Building effective appsCompanies that don’t monitor in-app behavior are taking shots in the dark with their marketing strategies. In contrast, businesses that know how and when customers use their apps can formulate campaigns based on their audiences’ needs. Users will be thrilled by the personalized experiences and become increasingly reliant on the app, as a result.Behavioral data also plays an important role in feature road maps. Your development team might brainstorm 15 cool-sounding functions, but none of those will land effectively if customers aren’t interested in them.Brands can’t know what the best feature set is until they monitor their customers’ patterns. How long do they stay within the homepage feed? How often do they hit “refresh”? Do they go down rabbit holes to discover new features? Or, do they favor the same one or two options over and over again?Here’s how companies can answer those questions and build effective long-term strategies:1. Integrate with an analytics service.Dozens of platforms offer must-have analytics services for any company that’s serious about app monetization. The price points vary from free access to several hundred dollars a month, so there are affordable options for businesses at every level. Choose a solution based on which data types it collects and how deep it can go when gathering insights.Google Analytics, the tried-and-true website standard, works wonderfully with both iOS and Android. It tracks how often users open an app, how long their sessions last and where they are when they’re using it. Google Analytics also records usage flows and button taps. Optimize the customer experience around these insights by creating a more intuitive, customized mobile experience.Related: 3 Mobile Analytics Platforms for Measuring User Engagement2. Transition to feature-rich platforms as the app grows.As the app gains traction, upgrade to more complex services, such as Mixpanel or Flurry. These platforms track in-depth metrics, including the average number of social media friends, frequency of social posts and engagement drop-off points. Deeper analytics go beyond anonymous user data and provide information about behaviors within the app ecosystem.Branch.io enables companies to record the entire customer journey, from the moment users tap an ad in Safari to the time it takes to click download in the App Store. Those data points indicate which marketing campaigns and promotions work.3. Refine the app experience based on user behavior.Behavioral patterns offer raw, real-time customer feedback. Analyze this data to learn which areas draw the most attention and which inspire people to use the app day after day. Invest in the areas that generate the most significant engagement and ROI. People will appreciate the fact that the app both meets their needs in increasingly specific ways and feels customized to their interests.Related: 6 Tips on Getting Customer Feedback and Making It ActionableSuccessful apps depend on great customer experiences. In order to stay competitive in an increasingly saturated world, companies must be ruthless about eliminating unpopular features and responding to user needs. After all, every garden must be weeded so the flowers can blossom. October 10, 2016 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Listen Now Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger.last_img read more

Workaholism Is the Threat That Masquerades as Dedication

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. You can’t miss them — large, white buses with tinted windows shuttling tech professionals both ways between San Francisco and the southern end of Silicon Valley. One day while stuck in traffic, I looked at the buses and thought, “Why can’t these smart companies create an algorithm to avoid sending people in both directions — thereby avoiding pushing them to start their workdays even earlier while en route to the office?”And then it hit me. We don’t need an algorithm to optimize who works from which location — we need to reimagine the workday for knowledge workers.Always-available culture. For most of my career, I’ve worked in tech in Silicon Valley. I remember the first time I got a device that allowed me to read work email away from my desk. It felt liberating. Then, as more people got mobile devices, our always-available culture became an everyone-always-on culture. I never realized how fatiguing it was to be on all the time until I got a chance to turn it off.Related: Working 80 Hours a Week is Not Actually What Leads to SuccessAt too many companies, there is no chance to turn it off. From the moment employees begin their morning commutes until the moment they check their email “just one more time” before closing their eyes at night, connected teams are working. Work seeps into every part of their life — their evenings, weekends and vacations. Even their sleep! And many business owners and leaders fuel this norm by operating the same way themselves.More harm than good.Studies show that this overwork — whether management requires it, encourages it or tacitly accepts it — is detrimental to our teams and our businesses. Is a team that works in always-on mode dedicated and productive — or perpetually on the brink of burnout?The downsides can be very real.Related: 3 Reasons Founders Need to Stop Trying So HardHealth problems result. And health problems lead to more sick days and a revolving door. Studies have shown that people who work more also drink more. They’re more likely to be depressed. They demonstrate a link between overwork and illnesses like diabetes and heart disease. Ailing employees eventually call in sick, and when they can’t take the pace anymore, they quit — and that’s expensive for companies.Tired employees don’t do good work.The difference between working 40 hours per week and working, say 55 or more, shows up in the quality of the work. In the ‘80s, the Whitehall II study in Great Britain highlighted a drop in cognitive function for those working longer schedules. Teams that spend more hours at their desks but get progressively less effective aren’t benefiting the business.Overworking doesn’t create a noticeable difference.We can’t tell the difference between employees who overwork and those who don’t. This was the finding of a Boston University business professor who studied consultants. Do you know whether your star performer is actually working 70 hours a week — or just pretending to in order to impress you? Research shows you probably can’t tell the difference.Related: Those 12-Hour Days Are Killing You Without Helping Your BusinessThese are the things that go through my mind when I see those white buses rolling through Silicon Valley, carrying knowledge workers who are “maximizing their days” by working through long commutes. As their days expand, the value these professionals deliver for their companies actually decreases. Ending this toxic workaholism — and building a healthier workforce and healthier companies — will require a loud, clear, honest call to action from the top. We need to lead by example and say to our teams, “Whatever work is following you into your evenings, weekends and vacations — it can wait.” Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read October 25, 2016 Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more