Village Of Fredonia To Distribute Bottled Water During State Of Emergency

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo Credit: PixabayFREDONIA – The Village of Fredonia will be distributing bottles of water this week after officials issued a State of Emergency due to a problem with its water system.Officials say the water will be distributed at the Village DPW, 176 Eagle St., Tuesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. both days.On Thursday, the Chautauqua County Health Department ordered customers of the Village of Fredonia Water System to boil water after high levels of cloudiness was found in a water sample taken on Wednesday.Residents who need further assistance can call (716) 679-1531 during normal business hours. last_img read more

Trail Mix: Bryan Sutton’s Bluegrass Licks

first_imgIt’s hard to imagine Bryan Sutton – easily the hottest bluegrass guitar player in the game today – feeling the need to come into his own.Sutton has toured with the likes of Bela Fleck and Chris Thile, been named the International Bluegrass Music Association’s guitar player of the year six times, produced a Grammy nominated record this year for Della Mae, has won three Grammys of his own – two during his time with Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder and one for a rendition of “Whiskey Before Breakfast” (with the iconic guitar player who happens to be the answer to the trivia question below) – and is one of the most in-demand sessions players in Nashville.What else did Sutton have to prove?  Nothing really, except to make the record that only he could make.  That record is Into My Own, which releases on Sugar Hill Records on April 29.  Sutton has stepped up his game both as a songwriter and a vocalist, and his new record is his most well-rounded to date.As always, Sutton is joined by some of the hottest pickers in bluegrass.  Sam Bush, Noam Pikelny, Stuart Duncan, Ronnie McCoury, Luke Bulla, and many others all lend their talents to this tight collection of bluegrass tunes.Trail Mix recently caught up with Bryan Sutton to chat guitars, bluegrass pickers, and that one guy he couldn’t believe he found himself on stage with.BRO – What’s your guitar of choice these days?BS – I’m fortunate to have some good options with guitars.  I tend to let the gig or general need define what guitar I’ll use.  I’ve been using a 1948 Martin D-28 for the last few years for most of the shows and sessions I’ve done.  This guitar feels extremely natural to me.  For Hot Rize shows, I enjoy playing Charles Sawtelle’s old 1937 D-28.  For most recording sessions, I take a pile of guitars.BRO – You are spending more and more time in front of a microphone these days.  Can you describe the challenge in growing your confidence as a singer?BS – The challenge for me as a singer has been trying to improve while doing.  Lots of times, my best opportunities for real “practice” are in front of hundreds of people.  Sort of trial by fire, I guess.  I’m also surrounded by great singers who are supportive and have made me feel a little more competent and confident.BRO – We are featuring “Log Jam” on this month’s Trail Mix.  What’s the story behind the song?BS – I experienced a pretty cool and short period of time where I wrote most of the instrumentals for this new record.  “Log Jam” came out of this time.  I came up with this little pattern at the top that I liked and I could recognize a groove, but the sense of a down beat was vague.  It built from there and revealed itself as a kind of blues jam turned on its head.BRO – Who is your favorite bluegrass picker?BS – Don’t make me answer that.  Without being an over-generalizer, I really recognize and honor certain individual strengths and contributions my favorite players have made and continue to make.  That being said, it’s hard to overlook Tony Rice for his personal influence on me as a player and the kind of mark he’s made in bluegrass guitar playing in general.  I don’t have a favorite ice cream flavor, ether.BRO – Have you ever met a bluegrass lick that’s gotten the best of you?BS – There’s this Kenny Baker phrase that most notably comes from his interpretation of “Muleskinner Blues.”  I can do it, but it seems to not flow the way I should when I try it in context.BRO – Finish and elaborate, please: “Holy shit.  I can’t believe I am on stage with . . .”BS –  Jack Black.  I worked on this record with this jazz bassist, Charlie Haden.  Jack is his son-in-law, and we did the Opry a few years ago.  We played a fast tune with a bunch of solos and Jack would fly around the stage like a wild man, dancing and carrying on.  It was a hoot.Our North Carolina friends can catch Bryan Sutton on the road with David Holt and T. Michael Coleman at Merlefest on April 24th, at the Tryon Fine Arts Center in Tryon on May 9th, and at the High Point Theater in High Point on May 10th.  Sutton returns to the stage with Hot Rize at Del Fest in Cumberland, Maryland, on May 23rd.  For all of our Elevation Outdoors readers in Colorado, Bryan will be part of the Telluride House Band in June and will be in Lyons for both the Rockygrass Academy and a Hot Rize concert in July.For more information on Bryan Sutton, when he might be heading to a stage near you, or how to get a copy of Into My Own, surf over to www.bryansutton.com.In the meantime, Trail Mix would like to give you a shot at getting your hands on Bryan’s new record a few days early!  Take a shot at the trivia question below.  Email your answers to dave@blueridgeoutdoors.com.  A winner will be chosen from all of the correct answers received by noon on Thursday, April 17.Question . . . . Bryan won a Grammy award in 2007 for his performance with what legendary acoustic bluegrass/mountain blues guitar player and patriarch of Merlefest?last_img read more

Health Laws Impact On Premiums Still A Question

first_imgHealth Law’s Impact On Premiums Still A Question Meanwhile, news outlets report on the Obama administration’s challenge to educate a largely uninformed public about the law’s benefits.McClatchy: Obamacare’s Big Decision: What Is It Going To Cost Me?The cost of health coverage under Obamacare remains one the biggest mysteries of the nation’s health care overhaul. But nagging cost questions will slowly be answered this summer as insurers and state officials set 2014 health plan rates for people who buy coverage outside of work or purchase it through small employers. Those two coverage areas – the individual and small group markets – face the biggest rule and cost changes next year, when the main provisions of the Affordable Care Act finally kick in (Pugh, 6/17). NPR: To Find Out How The Health Law Affects You, Ask The PresidentCall it the Affordable Care Act, call it Obamacare, call it whatever you want — it’s coming. And soon. In less than four months people without health insurance will be able to start signing up for coverage that begins Jan. 1. A lot has been said about the law, most of it not that understandable. So starting now, and continuing occasionally through the summer and fall, we’re going to try to fix that (Rovner, 6/17).Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Enrolling Uninsured In Obamacare Will Be A ChallengeRay Bochas had little reason to learn about the details of the Affordable Care Act before February. That’s when the InnoWare paper napkin and plate factory in Menomonee Falls shut down, and he lost his job and his health insurance. … He has heard that he’s supposed to get health insurance next year but doesn’t know what he and his wife will need to do. The Affordable Care Act’s main goal of increasing the number of people with health insurance could hinge on reaching people like Bochas who will be eligible next year for coverage through Medicaid or through subsidized health plans sold on marketplaces known as exchanges (Boulton, 6/15). The Wall Street Journal’s Law Journal: Want A Law Job? Learn The Health-Care ActSome companies are warning that President Barack Obama’s health-care overhaul will cost jobs. It won’t be in their legal departments. Health-care companies racing to comply with the Affordable Care Act and other rules are calling in the lawyers, sparking a mini-boom for specialist attorneys who can backstop overloaded internal teams and steer clients through an increasingly crowded regulatory minefield (Smith, 6/16).And here’s the latest on how accountable care organizations are shaping up — Medpage Today: Distribution Of ACOs Varies WidelyMore than 40 percent of accountable care organizations (ACOs) formed under Medicare exist in only five states, leaving many states with one or none, according to an analysis by industry experts. Medicare ACOs are concentrated in states like Florida (32), California (22), and Massachusetts (18) but rural states — like North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Kansas — are devoid of them, according to the analysis by consulting firm MedeAnalytics in Emeryville, Calif. Others like Montana, Idaho, Mississippi each only have one Medicare ACO (Pittman, 6/14). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more