Road Closures for Olympia Women’s March

first_imgFacebook34Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The Department of Enterprise ServicesThe Department of Enterprise Services has issued a permit for a Saturday, January 21, event that organizers say could bring up to 2,500 attendees to the state Capitol Campus. The Women’s March on Washington will bring its event, the “Women’s March on Olympia,” to the area near the Tivoli Fountain about 10:00 a.m., where the march will begin. The march also will travel along several city streets, and end at the north steps of the Legislative Building. There will be closures on the following roads, beginning at 10:00 a.m.:11th Avenue at Capitol Way (west)Union Avenue at Capitol Way (west)10th Avenue at Capitol Way (west)9th Avenue at Capitol Way (west)Amanda Smith at Capitol Way (west)Legion Way at Capitol Way (west)Columbia at 5th Avenue (south)Water Street at 5th Avenue (south)A complete list of upcoming permitted campus events is available on the Enterprise Services website.Route Map (subject to change):last_img read more

Soles, Leafs blank Rebels 3-0

first_imgIt was “return the favour time” for the Nelson Leafs.After being shutout in the last meeting between the two teams, Leaf netminder Brett Soles picked up his mates with a 21-save performance to lead Nelson to a 3-0 victory over rival Castlegar Rebels in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Friday night at the NDCC Arena.The two teams play the back half of the home-and-home series Saturday in Castlegar.Game time is 7:30 p.m. in the Castlegar Complex.There is much difference between the two teams this season.The teams are tied at 1-1-1 in three games this season while Nelson has outscored the Rebels 8-6 in the set. Friday, Castlegar held a 14-13 advantage in shots after two periods before Colton McCarthy and Matthew Naka scored less than two minutes apart in the third to give Soles all the offence he would need.The goal by McCarthy, his tenth of the season to lead the Leafs, came on the power play.The former Kootenay Ice of the B.C. Major Midget League stacked the pads the rest of the contest to give Nelson its first win of the season against its Murdoch rivals and move the Leafs into a second-place tie in the division.Soles earned the game’s first star for his 21-save, rock-solid, performance.Connor Beauchamp, who also had a strong game between the pipes, took the loss for Castlegar.Jacob Boyczuk, a force on the body all game long, added an empty net marker to secure the win.Castlegar lost team leader Erik Alden in the first period when the Rebel defenceman took exception to a hit by Leaf rearguard Kevin Bow, squaring off with the Nelson player late in the first period.GAME NOTES: Nelson welcomed back defenceman Blake Arcuri to the roster after the local product missed the first nine games of the season. . . .The return of Arcuri was good news for a Nelson team missing a few defenceman due to injury. Once again forward Linden Horswill was moved back to the bluelines to help the cause. Both Leaf defencmen, Cole Arcuri and Cam Weir, missed the game due to injury.last_img read more

Pirates vie for Africa greatness

first_imgFirst round Zanaco (Zambia) 1-0, 2-1, 3-1 Second round TP Mazembe (DR Congo) 3-1, 0-1, 3-2 Group stage AC Leopards (DR Congo) 0-0 (h) Al Ahly (Egypt) 3-0 (a) Zamalek (Egypt) 4-1 (h) Zamalek (Egypt) 1-2 (a) AC Leopards (DR Congo) 0-1 (a) Al Ahly (Egypt) 0-0 (h) Preliminary round Djabal Club (Comoros) 5-0, 4-0, 9-0center_img Semi-finals Esperance (Tunisia) 0-0, 1-1, 1-1 (won on away goals) 1 November 2013 Orlando Pirates, who face Egypt’s Al Ahly in the first leg of the CAf Champions League final at Orlando Stadium in Soweto on Saturday, will be attempting to follow in the footsteps of the great Pirates side of 1995 – the only South African team to have won the African Champions League. The current team has resembled its predecessors by producing impressive results away from home, going against the grain to achieve the away wins and draws, which are traditionally exceptionally hard to come by in African competition. In fact, when the Buccaneers claimed the trophy in 1995, they also did it the hard way, drawing 2-2 with Asec Abidjan of the Ivory Coast in Soweto in the first leg of the final, before winning 1-0 away from home to come out on top 3-2 on aggregate. A fearsome test Pirates face a fearsome test in the 2013 final against Al Ahly, a team that the Confederation of African Football (Caf) named the “African Club of the Century” in 2000. With seven Caf Champions League titles to its name, Al Ahly is the most successful club in the history of the competition. It has also won a record 36 Egyptian Premier League titles, won the bronze medal in the Fifa Club World Cup in 2006, and placed fourth in the competition in 2012. However, Roger De Sa’s charges are unlikely to be overwhelmed by the task at hand, even though the task awaiting them is likely to be much tougher than it was in the group stages, when they faced Al Ahly during Ramadan, while the players were fasting, and in front of an empty stadium due to political unrest in Egypt. That’s what the 3-0 result in that game will do for players. Feet on the ground An impressive 4-1 victory over Al Ahly’s arch-rivals Zamalek will also serve as a confidence-booster for the Soweto giants, but a 1-2 defeat to the same side in Egypt and a goalless draw against Al Ahly at the Orlando Stadium will ensure that the South African club’s players keep their feet on the ground. On their way to the final, a victory over Democratic Republic of Congo powerhouse TP Mazembe, who appeared in the semi-finals of the Champions League in 2012, was a particular highlight and the kind of victory from which players grow. There were some who believed the Congolese would end the Buccaneers’ run, but a goal from Onyekachi Okonkwo in the second minute sent them on their way to a 3-1 victory in Soweto as Collins Mbesuma added a double. Away from home, however, Pirates were able to overcome the dark side of football in Africa, losing 1-0 on the day, but progressing 3-2 on aggregate, despite having to put up with multiple nasty hurdles. It began with the television broadcast of the match, which was cut just before kick-off in Lubumbashi. Then, during the game, Pirates captain Lucky Lekgwathi was shown a dubious red card and Mazembe were controversially awarded two penalties. Goalkeeper Senzo Meyiwa, however, stood firm, saving both spot kicks to steer the Sea Robbers into the group stages of Africa’s premier club competition.Semi-final victory The side’s semi-final victory over Tunisia’s Esperance was also a notable feat. The Blood and Gold had in the previous three seasons won the Champions League in 2011 and finished as runners-up in 2010 and 2012. In the first leg of the semi-finals, they played a very defensive game in Soweto and managed to hold Pirates to a goalless draw. De Sa’s charges used that result to their advantage, however, and by scoring an away goal they effectively forced Esperance to score two goals to win the game in Tunisia. They could not, and the 1-1 draw saw the South African club into the final on the away goals rule. Character-building Such character-building results will have shown the Pirates players that they have it within them to capture the Caf Champions League title again. South Africans football fans, including fans who normally have allegiance to other clubs, appear to have rallied behind the Buccaneers. The common view is that a victory for Pirates would be a victory for South Africa. The Soweto club has displayed impressive maturity during the Champions League competition to undo the traditional dominance of teams from central and north Africa. A victory, though, is needed to round off the job and boost South Africa’s Premier Soccer League.Bring on the football!Pirates’ path to the finallast_img read more

August establishment of perennial forages

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our wet weather conditions throughout much of 2017 prevented spring establishment of perennial forages for many producers.  Additionally, the wet weather has caused stand loss in alfalfa fields due to compaction and crown damage from harvest on wet soils, and from root rot in poorly drained field areas.  As a result, replacement of some of those acres is necessary.  August provides growers with another window of opportunity to establish a perennial forage stand. Typically, the main risk with a late summer August planting is having sufficient moisture for seed germination and plant growth but this year that risk may be low.There are some advantages to late summer forage planting as compared to a spring planting. Late summer planting means forage seedlings are not competing with the flush of annual spring and summer weed emergence/growth. The soil borne root rot and damping off disease organisms that thrive in cool, wet soils are not an issue.  However, growers need to be aware of planting dates and the potential for late summer diseases in some situations.According to the newly revised, 15th edition of the Ohio Agronomy guide, planting of alfalfa and other legumes should be completed by mid-August in Northern Ohio and by the end of August in Southern Ohio.  These timelines take into consideration average frost dates and the time needed for forage plants to develop a root system capable of overwintering.  For example, at about 8 to 10 weeks after emergence alfalfa plants pull the growing point below the soil surface, a process termed ‘contractile growth’.  Once contractile growth occurs the alfalfa plant is considered a true perennial.  The alfalfa plant needs to reach this growth stage to overwinter. Clover plants also need to have a crown formed, and grasses should be at least in the tillering stage of development before the onset of winter.If the fall is warm and extended, similar to what we have experienced the past few years, it might be possible for successful establishment with later planting dates.  Some alfalfa growers believe that the late summer planting deadline dates can be moved back by several weeks.  It is a question of risk management.  How lucky do you feel? Late summer and early fall planting dates of forages were tested in Pennsylvania in the mid-1990’s at two locations that historically are a little milder than most of Ohio’s winters. The year after seeding legumes, forage yield declined as planting dates were delayed after early August in the previous year. For each day planting was delayed after August 1, total forage dry matter yields the next year were reduced by an average of 158, 105, and 76 lbs./acre for alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil.  Later planting dates usually affected grasses to a lesser degree.  For example, orchardgrass yields only decreased significantly when planting was delayed past late-August and perennial ryegrass yields were actually greater in late-August than in early August plantings.  However, for each day planting was delayed after August 30, yields declined 100 lb. /acre for orchardgrass and 153 lb. /acre for perennial ryegrass. Reed canarygrass, a slow establisher, was more sensitive to planting dates. Reed canarygrass yields the year after seeding declined 120 lbs. /acre for each day planting was delayed after August 1.   The best policy is usually to plant most perennial forages as soon in August as possible, when soils conditions allow and when soil moisture is present.Sclerotinia crown and stem rot is a concern with no-till seedings of alfalfa in late summer and especially where clover has been present in the past. This pathogen causes white mold on alfalfa seedlings. They become infected during cooler rainy spells in late October and November, the disease develops during the winter, and seedlings literally “melt away” in winter and early spring. It can be devastating where the pathogen is present. No-till is especially risky where clover has been present because the sclerotia germinate from a shallow depth. Early August plantings dramatically improve the alfalfa’s ability to resist the infection. Late August seedings are very susceptible, with mid-August plantings being intermediate.In a no-till situation, minimize competition from existing weeds by applying a burndown application of glyphosate before planting. Using no-till when herbicide-resistant weeds are present creates a very difficult situation with no effective control options, so tillage is probably a better choice in those situations. Post-emergence herbicide options exist for alfalfa. After the alfalfa is up and growing, control late summer and fall emerging winter annual broadleaf weeds. A mid- to late fall application of Butyrac, Buctril Pursuit or Raptor are the primary herbicide options. Fall application is much more effective than a spring application for control of these weeds especially if wild radish/wild turnip are in the weed mix.  Pursuit and Raptor can control winter annual grasses in the fall in pure legume stands but not with a mixed alfalfa/grass planting.  Consult the 2017 Ohio and Indiana Weed Control Guide and always read the specific product label for guidelines on timing and rates before applying any product.For conventional tillage seeding prepare a firm seedbed to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Be aware that too much tillage depletes soil moisture and increases the risk of soil crusting. Follow the “footprint guide” that soil should be firm enough for a footprint to sink no deeper than one-half inch.  Tilled seedbeds do not need a pre-plant herbicide.  Finally, keep in mind the following factors to increase establishment success.Soil fertility and pH: The recommended soil pH for alfalfa is 6.8. Forage grasses and clovers should have a pH of 6.0 or above. The minimum or critical soil phosphorus level for forage legumes is 25 ppm and the critical soil potassium level is somewhere between 100 and 125 ppm for many of our soils.Seed selection: Be sure to use high quality seed of adapted, tested varieties and use fresh inoculum of the proper Rhizobium bacteria. “Common” seed (variety not stated) is usually lower yielding and not as persistent, and from our trials the savings in seed cost is lost within the first year or two by lower forage yields.Planter calibration: If coated seed is used, be aware that coatings can account for up to one-third of the weight of the seed. This affects the number of seeds planted in planters set to plant seed on a weight basis. Seed coatings can also dramatically alter how the seed flows through the drill, so calibrate the drill or planter with the seed going into the field.Seed placement: The recommended seeding depth for forages is one-quarter to one-half inch deep. It is better to err on the side of planting shallow rather than too deep.Do not harvest a new perennial forage stand this fall. The ONLY exception to this rule is perennial and Italian ryegrass plantings.  Mow or harvest these grasses to a two and a half to three-inch stubble in late November to improve winter survival.  Do not cut any other species, especially legumes.last_img read more

Six Tech Trends That Will Rock Enterprise IT In 2013

first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… antone gonsalves IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Related Posts center_img Tags:#Big Data#predictions#social media In 2012, IT growth and innovation centered around mobile devices, cloud services, social networking and Big Data. 2013 is likely to see accelerated adoption in all those areas, as many companies move from experimenting and testing to deployment.What follows are 2013 predictions for some of the fastest growing next-generation technologies in enterprise IT. If 2012 seemed like a tumultuous year, then hold on to your hats. Next year is going to be another bumpy ride.1. Big DataFirst up is Big Data. 2013 will see companies continue to spend much more on databases and business intelligence tools to drive innovation and boost operational efficiency. Big Data technologies will have the most impact in the financial industry as well as medical and scientific research. Corporations wanting to deploy business analytics will look to those industries for guidance.International Data Corp. defines Big Data as new generation “technologies and architectures, designed to economically extract value from very large volumes of a wide variety of data by enabling high-velocity capture, discovery and/or analysis.” In 2010, companies spent $3.2 billion worldwide in Big Data technology.In 2015, Big Data spending will reach $16.9 billion, representing a compound annual growth rate of 40% or about 7 times the growth rate of the overall information and communications technology market, IDC says. Because growth will outpace the supply of talent, companies are expected to look to vendors for cloud-based services that can offload much of the work from inside IT staff.While software and services are expected to make up the majority of Big Data spending, companies will be spending on infrastructure at a faster rate. Spending on storage will grow the fastest through 2015 with a CAGR of more than 61%, IDC says.2. Software-Defined NetworkingOn the networking side, software-defined networking (SND) will enter the refinement process needed before products are ready for production use, according to Forrester. The maturation process will take roughly five years, as SDN components are tied together and technology added for integration with management systems, orchestration software, hypervisor management products and networking protocols. Forrester recommends that companies prepare for industry adoption of SDN by starting training for IT staff in 2013.3. In-Memory ComputingWhile watching carefully developments in SDN, many companies are expected to take in-memory computing to the mainstream, with the help of vendors such as SAP and Oracle, Gartner says. “Numerous vendors will deliver in-memory-based solutions over the next two years driving this approach into mainstream use.” As the name implies, in-memory computing brings data sets closer to computational engines, replacing the much slower architecture that involves pulling information from a database in a separate server. This opens up the possibility of real-time or near real-time results from transactional and analytical applications running against the same in-memory dataset. A mouthful to be sure, but the process could mean big advancements in how fast companies can analyze and act up on the data they gather.4. Social Technologies Drives Enteprise CollaborationIn the front office, employees’ use of social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, is driving companies to build their own enterprise social networks to give workers secure areas for collaboration and sharing data. In 2013, IDC predicts these networks will move beyond the pilot stage and into production.Gartner sees a similar trend with enterprise app stores for smartphones and tablets. Faced with vendors limiting stores to specific devices, companies will deliver private application stores to workers by 2014. This will avoid the multiple payment processes and licensing terms that would come from using public stores from vendors.5. Windows 8 Doesn’t Get TractionOn the desktop, Microsoft is not expected to win big in the enterprise with Windows 8 until well after 2013 – if ever. Gartner says 90% of corporations will skip large-scale deployment of the latest version of the operating system through 2015. Most enterprises and their PC management vendors are not ready to deal with the touch interface Microsoft has added to its flagship product. As a result, companies will wait until support for the dramatic OS change becomes widespread in the business technology market.6. Gamification WinsFinally, techniques used in building addiction to playing online games will get adopted to boost worker productivity. Measurement of performance, feedback and incentives will be used to engage employees and tie their actions more closely to business outcomes, Gartner says. The worldwide market for gamification technology and services will rise from $242 million this year to $2.8 billion in 2016. Within three years, 40% of the Global 1000 companies will use gaming techniques, a process called gamification, to improve performance and efficiency of their business operations. Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

BJP running a repressive regime, says Pawar

first_imgAccusing the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) of running a “repressive regime”, Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) chief Sharad Pawar on Tuesday said he was named in an Enforcement Directorate case despite being blameless, while the Supreme Court had to order a criminal trial of Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis.Mr. Pawar’s jibes at Mr. Fadnavis came after the Supreme Court set aside the Bombay High Court order which gave the Chief Minister a clean chit in a case of allegedly suppressing details of pending criminal cases in his election affidavit of 2014.The NCP chief said the government only indulged in pressure tactics and was least bothered about the plight of the farmers. “We have to end this dictatorial government,” he said, addressing a rally at Islampur in Sangli district.“I have seen many elections, but this one is especially important as it an election of the youth. I have full faith that the younger generation of leaders is going to perform outstandingly well in the Assembly polls,” Mr. Pawar said.Earlier, he accompanied NCP State president Jayant Patil as he filed his nomination papers for the Islampur Assembly constituency. The Islampur-Walva area has been the stronghold of the Patil family for more than 50 years, with Mr. Patil’s father, Rajarambapu, having been elected from Walva (prior to its delimitation as Islampur) no less than three times. Mr. Patil, a six-time MLA, has been winning the segment consecutively since the 1990 Assembly elections, four times from Walva and twice from Islampur. Mr. Pawar earlier also accompanied NCP MLA Rahul Mote, who filed his nomination for the Paranda Assembly segment in Osmanabad. The NCP chief suffered a major setback in Osmanabad after Padamsinha Patil, one of Mr. Pawar’s closest confidants, and his son, Ranajagjitsinha Patil, the sitting NCP MLA, quit the party to join the BJP.last_img read more

From state bodies to players, BCCI releases funds for all

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 13 (PTI) The BCCI has released pending payments to various stakeholders which include Test match centres, state bodies, match fee of India players besides salary of coaches and commentators. Also the IPL franchises were paid one installment of their share from the “Net Central Rights”. The boards website has uploaded all the payments and specific heads under which the invoices have been created from January to March. According to payments made in March, the cash-strapped Delhi and Districts Cricket Association (DDCA) have been paid approx Rs 1.69 crore under the head: “Advance against amount due to association”. The amount has been released on March 22 and will go a long way to help the staff, who have not been paid salaries for months. The BCCI has also paid Rs 1.45 crore and Rs 5.54 crore (approx) on two separate counts — property tax and service tax — on behalf of DDCA. The payments to various Test centres have also been made. Accordingly, Himachal Pradesh and Hyderabad have received approximately Rs 2.82 crore each while Maharashtra and Andhra were paid Rs 4.52 crore respectively. Among the IPL franchises — promoters of KKR and Sunrisers received Rs 21 crore each, while Kings XI Punjab received Rs 22.5 crore. The promoters of Mumbai Indians — Indiawin Sports Private Limited and Delhi Daredevils owner GMR Sports received Rs 23 crore each. All the top Indian players received their match fees plus retainership fees for various tours during the last international season. Chief coach Anil Kumble has received “professional fees” of approx Rs 48.75 lakh each for December and January while Rahul Dravid, currently coach Delhi Daredevils, has received two separate amounts of Rs 41.44 lakh and Rs 1.89 crore (approx) during the 2016 season for coaching India U-19 and A sides. The top Indian commentators have also been paid their fees for various broadcasting assignments. Both Sunil Gavaskar and Ravi Shastri have been paid approx Rs 56.93 lakh each for the England series. Likewise, L Sivaramakrishnan and Sanjay Manjrekar were paid Rs 26.25 lakh and Rs 42 lakh respectively for the England series. PTI KHS BS KHSadvertisementlast_img read more

Former Leafs player Dave Tiger Williams facing sexual assault charge

first_imgFormer Toronto Maple Leafs player Dave ‘Tiger’ Williams is facing a charge of sexual assault related to an alleged incident aboard a military flight in 2017.According to the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service, Williams was a passenger on a flight last December as part of a morale visit to deployed Canadian Armed Forces personnel in Latvia when the alleged incident occurred.No details of the incident have been revealed except that Williams, 64, has been charged with one count of sexual assault and one count of assault.While the charge was laid by the military, the case is scheduled to proceed through the civilian court system in Ottawa.Williams was released from custody on a promise to appear in court. A hearing date has not yet been set.“We were just made aware of the charges against Mr. Williams, a member of our alumni association,” said Toronto Maple Leafs President Brendan Shanahan. “First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the incredible courage of this woman for coming forward. As an organization, we stand firmly against all or any forms of physical and emotional assault. With so little information available to us at this moment, and out of respect for the necessary legal process, we will refrain from commenting any further at this time.”Williams was one of the most popular players with the Maple Leafs from 1974 to 1980. His NHL career also included stops in Vancouver, Detroit, Los Angeles and Hartford.last_img read more

Doctors angry at opposition to planned tax changes urge Ottawa to forge

first_imgTORONTO – Doctors across Canada who support Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s proposed tax reforms say they want their voices to be heard above the din of criticism from colleagues and medical societies.To make their point, they have been putting signatures on a letter they plan to send to Morneau this week.“We were really fed up with the narrative that our colleagues were putting forth and that our medical associations were putting forth as the only opinion out there,” said Dr. Sarah Giles. “We’ll probably have friends never talk to us again. People are ridiculously emotional about this.”Among other things, Morneau wants to stop allowing some tax-saving mechanisms through incorporation that physicians say are essential given that they have no access to benefits other employees enjoy. Angry medical associations say doctors will leave Canada for the U.S., and female physicians will be disproportionately hurt.The president of the Canadian Medical Association said in a recent statement that a delegation had told Morneau that doctors rely on the measures now in place for working capital needed for expanding their practices and, among other things, to deal with “unanticipated costs, sick or parental leave, staff turnover, and other business requirements.”Signatories to the open letter, a copy of which was obtained by The Canadian Press, see it much differently. They argue that scrapping the current system will promote tax fairness and give the government more money to spend on health care.“We need adequate tax revenues to fund social programs such as affordable housing, pharmacare, social assistance, legal aid, and the health-care system itself,” the letter states. “These programs directly impact the health of our patients, and we believe it is important for us to contribute to their sustainability through an adequate tax base.”Giles, who does stints working with remote Indigenous communities and abroad with Doctors without Borders, said diverting dollars from doctors toward improved care would benefit her money-strapped patients far more than it would harm physicians.“There’s a lot of catastrophising,” she said of those upset at Morneau’s plans. “Why are they hanging their hats on this issue? It feels very self-serving.”Canadian Medical Association data suggest a large majority of physicians are incorporated. That means they can access various measures to reduce their taxes despite earning significantly more on average — upwards of $225,000 annually before taxes — than other Canadians.“These benefits are advantageous mostly to certain incorporated doctors,” the letter states. “It also seems unfair that these benefits are not available to Canadians with similar incomes who cannot incorporate.”The physicians do say in their letter the proposed changes should come with a transition plan for those affected and as part of a “comprehensive review” of tax policy.Rita McCracken, a family doctor in Vancouver who said she was bombarded with advice on incorporating to save taxes even when she was in medical school, expressed disappointment at what she considers reactionary physician organizations who should be pushing for improvements to the health-care system. Any suggestion the proposed measures are “anti-feminist” is misguided, she said.McCracken contacted colleagues with the aim of expressing a fact-based alternative view, leading to the letter to Morneau.“It just seemed to us there was some motivation from very high earners who wanted to continue to be able to pay less tax,” McCracken said. “(But) people who make more money should pay more taxes.”Lesley Barron, an incorporated general surgeon in Georgetown, Ont., said she supports the proposals even though her family’s bottom line will take a hit. Morneau’s approach will help make the tax system more fair, she said.“I don’t believe it makes sense for physicians to fund retirement, benefits, and maternity leave through these tax loopholes,” Barron said.Another letter signatory, Ritika Goel, a family doctor with an inner city practice in Toronto, said the din of criticism from many doctors makes it important an alternative perspective be heard. The current system isn’t the way to address issues Morneau critics are raising, she said. Goel, who is currently on leave to look after her baby, says maternity benefits are in fact available to doctors in Ontario.“Beyond that, I’m in an income position that has allowed me to have savings to take maternity leave,” she said.last_img read more

Grande Prairie Mounties still investigating disappearance of 33 yearold woman nine years

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The Grande Prairie RCMP say they’re still investigating the disappearance of a woman nine years ago, and are hoping members of the public might have more information about the case.It was nine years ago Thursday when Jody Hockett was last seen in Grande Prairie. Hockett was last seen entering a white vehicle outside of the York Hotel on February 22, 2009.Hockett is described as Caucasian, standing 5’5” tall, with blue eyes and dyed strawberry blonde hair. When she was last seen she was wearing jeans, a tank top, a black zip-up hooded sweatshirt, and high heeled shoes with fur on them. Hockett was 33 years old at the time of her disappearance. She may also be known by the names “Jody Smith”, “Jodi” or “Jessie”.After years of searching for her, Jody’s family is looking for closure. Police say they are continuing to actively investigate all leads, and urge anyone with any information about Jody Hockett’s disappearance to contact Grande Prairie RCMP Detachment at 780-830-5700. Should you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers by phone at 1.800.222.8477 (TIPS).Photo supplied by RCMPlast_img read more