EU offers 400 million euros to WHO-led COVID-19 vaccine initiative

first_imgTopics : “And also we’re negotiating with the rest of EU members. One possibility we are checking is for the EU members to join as a bloc. I think the best way to end this pandemic is through solidarity, through cooperation, through oneness,” Tedros added.The COVAX initiative aims to purchase for all countries in the world 2 billion doses of potential COVID-19 shots from several vaccine makers by the end of 2021.The EU financial support will be provided through guarantees, the Commission said. A spokeswoman for the EU executive did not clarify how these guarantees would be offered and why they were preferred to direct funding in cash.”Today, the Commission is announcing a 400 million euro contribution to COVAX for working together in purchasing future vaccines to the benefit of low and middle income countries,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said. The EU Commission is negotiating advance purchases of COVID-19 vaccines with several drugmakers on behalf of the 27 EU states and has previously said that EU governments cannot buy vaccines through parallel procurement schemes.Asked whether its guidance to EU states not to buy vaccines through COVAX was now dropped, a commission spokeswoman declined to elaborate.”The detailed terms and conditions for the EU’s participation and contribution will be worked out in the coming days and weeks,” the Commission said.The Commission added in a statement that it was ready, together with EU states, “to put expertise and resources at work within COVAX to accelerate and scale-up development and manufacturing of a global supply of vaccines for citizens across the world, in poor and rich countries.”Critics have said that by buying vaccines exclusively through an EU scheme, the Commission was effectively undermining the WHO-led initiative.The Commission said it was committed to donating to developing countries some of the vaccines it buys through its procurement scheme.At least 172 countries have registered expressions of interest in COVAX, including 92 low- and middle-income countries eligible to secure doses through the GAVI vaccine alliance which covers much of their cost. Some 80 self-financing countries have also submitted expressions of interest and must make firm commitments by Sept. 18.The United States, Japan, Britain and the EU have struck their own deals to secure millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses for their citizens, ignoring the WHO’s warnings that “vaccine nationalism” will squeeze supplies.center_img The European Commission said on Monday that it would contribute to an initiative led by the World Health Organization to buy COVID-19 vaccines, while the WHO said Germany had joined the pact and that the agency was still negotiating with the bloc.The Commission, announcing that it would provide 400 million euros ($478 million) in guarantees, did not clarify whether EU states would acquire shots through the WHO scheme.”Germany has joined the COVAX facility today,” WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Gheybreyesus told a news conference in Geneva without elaborating the terms.last_img read more

Five key skills all successful fmcg buyers have

first_imgSource: The GrocerGreat buyers have an extensive knowledge of what’s on their competitor’s shelvesMarket awarenessSuccessful buyers have a genuine interest in their category and know exactly what’s going on in the market. They’ll read lots of trade magazines, know what their competitors are doing and have a good grasp on the effect their category decisions have on the wider market.They’re tasked with growing market share, so buyers for big retailers need to be aware of what’s happening within their category at the discounters and in the convenience market, too.There’s also the small matter of understanding what consumers want from a category and trying to anticipate their needs. Outside of market data, buyers also deal with spreadsheets for their promotional calendar, pricing, volume vs profit and forecasting, so strong excel skills are a must.And to top it off, all categories have a regular flow of NPD to be managed. Every new product will come with its own calendar of tasks to be completed.Sharp commercial acumenBuyers need to understand how to plan, manage and implement budgets. Not only should they be aware of their top line sales, but also their bottom line in the short and long term.They’re also joint business planning, considering the commercial outcomes for their retailer and suppliers – so a buyer has to have strong money management skills.Master negotiating skillsBuyers spend a lot of time sitting in front of suppliers. They need to be able to negotiate the best deals that work for both parties: that might mean convincing suppliers to provide marketing support, or asking them to shell out money for certain shelf space. It’s always a case of give and take, and a great buyer can use their influence to get the best outcome. Buyers who work in chilled categories also have to juggle the short shelf lives of productsThe ability to keep calm under pressureBuyers need to be incredibly fast decision makers. If their boss sets a target and there’s limited space on shelf, there’s no time for flapping. If the category is underperforming, buyers need to act quickly and make tough decisions to still make their KPIs.And on top of this, buyers working in chilled have to work even faster because of their products’ short shelf lives. Are you a buyer working in own-label?center_img Enter The Grocer’s Best of Own-Label Awards for free today and get the recognition you deserve. We’ll be crowning Best Own-Label Buyer, Best Own-Label Range and Best Own-Label Team among several other enviable titles. Check out the rest of the categories and enter for free here. They’re at the forefront of food and drink trends, they introduce exciting new flavour combinations that excite the masses and take part in endless tasting sessions. To the outside world it can look like buyers have one of the best jobs in the world. But, the reality is, there’s a lot more to the job than trying out new products.We spoke to Emilie Gregson from specialist fmcg recruitment agency Signature Career Management to find out the most important skills that all of the UK’s best fmcg buyers have in their arsenal.,Strong excel skills are important to keep track of promotional calendars and pricingStrong data and organisational skillsSomeone who can’t read and interpret data isn’t going to cut it as a buyer.Buyers can’t rely on suppliers to give them the market analysis they need to plan their category. Some suppliers might offer up unbiased reports, but others will only provide the figures they want a buyer to see. And buyers could be dealing with up to 50 different suppliers all telling them different things – it’s their job to cut through the noise and find the real story within the data. And startups won’t have any data at all.last_img read more