Demolition of Massive Complex at Chanute AFB Set to Begin

first_imgTwenty-two years after Chanute Air Force Base in east central Illinois was shuttered, work to ready the 400,000-square-foot White Hall office building for demolition is scheduled to begin within days.The massive building — DOD’s largest until the Pentagon was completed — was left to decay over the past two decades due to the prohibitive cost required to rehabilitate it.The contractor will employ a variety of safety measures to limit potential hazards to its workers and the surrounding community. Prior to demolition, Greenville, S.C.-based CB&I Federal Services will remove all asbestos and lead-based paint, as well as fixtures that can be taken to a landfill.The site will be placed under negative air pressure during the asbestos removal process, with dust suppression systems being used, including wetting down material. Large concrete portions will be hauled away and crushed at another site. High-efficiency particulate absorption filtration will be used to keep material within the containment areas. Both asbestos content and the workers will be monitored under the $7.9 million contract.Demolition is expected to be completed by September 2016, reported the Rantoul Press.   Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

NASA telescope spies unusual galaxies from dawn of the universe

first_img Share your voice Spitzer’s deep-field view of the sky awash with galaxies. Circled in red are incredibly faint, distant galaxies that the telescope observed for over 200 hours.  NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/Spitzer/P. Oesch/S. De Barros/I.Labbe Astronomers surveying the sky with NASA’s Spitzer space telescope have been able to peer back to the early universe, 13 billion years in the past, and find some of the very first galaxies. They look like tiny, orange dots aglow in a sea of darkness — not too dissimilar to the famed first image of a black hole — but the miniscule lights imaged by Spitzer contain a host of young stars, composed mostly of hydrogen and helium. The discovery of these unexpectedly-bright galaxies could provide new clues about one of the most important cosmic events in history: the “Epoch of Reionization.”The new research, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society in April, required Spitzer to stare into the same region of sky for over 200 hours, studying the ancient cosmos as part of a campaign known as the GOODS Re-ionization Era wide-Area Treasury from Spitzer (GREATS). Another great, the Hubble Space Telescope, also contributed to the data. Post a comment More space news Tags NASA Space With Spitzer trained on a region of the sky for so long, it was able to gather light that had traveled across the universe to reach us. In what amounts to a cosmic staring contest, Spitzer didn’t blink. The telescope detected faint infrared signals from 135 distant galaxies, produced by high levels of ionizing radiation. It’s a particularly important finding, because ionizing radiation is believed to have contributed to the Epoch of Reionization in the early universe — a cosmic transformation that shaped the universe as we know it today. Astronomers are still stumped as to what exactly caused these changes, but the early galaxies detected by Spitzer may provide some clues.”Our latest Spitzer result reveals how different these early galaxies are to those at later times and pinpoints our sample as a key set for providing insights into how galaxies so efficiently reionized the universe,” said Garth Illingworth, a co-author on the new study. The results were surprising for Michael Werner, project scientist with Spitzer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.”We did not expect that Spitzer, with a mirror no larger than a Hula-Hoop, would be capable of seeing galaxies so close to the dawn of time,” he said in a statement. “But nature is full of surprises, and the unexpected brightness of these early galaxies, together with Spitzer’s superb performance, puts them within range of our small but powerful observatory.”  Spitzer, launched in 2003, is an infrared observatory in an Earth-trailing orbit operated by NASA and the California Institute of Technology. It carries three instruments that allow it to “see” across the wavelengths of infrared light, providing spectacular views of the gaseous, dusty distant cosmos.center_img Sci-Tech 0 Your wedding ring came from a neutron star explosion, 4.6 billion years ago Scientists just observed a crash between two neutron stars Gravitational wave detectors upgraded to hunt for ‘extreme cosmic events’ NASA Spitzer telescope celebrates 15 years of astounding images 15 Photoslast_img read more

No Virat Kohli but Rohit Sharma and Jasprit Bumrah in ICC Team

first_imgTwitterThe ICC, after the completion of the Cricket World Cup, have announced the Team of the Tournament. Only two Indians find a place in the XI and it doesn’t include the captain Virat Kohli. Opener Rohit Sharma, who scored five centuries in the tournament, and Jasprit Bumrah, whose primacy in the world of ODI bowling was once again proven, were part of the chosen group of players.Virat had an uncharacteristically underwhelming time in the event. Coming into the World Cup with 41 ODI centuries, just eight short of Sachin Tendulkar’s world record mark of 49, he failed to add any in the 10 matches that India played. There were some high-class fifties from Kohli but, surprisingly, he failed to convert any of them into three-figure scores. Rohit Sharma scored five hundreds in the tournamentTwitter/ICCRohit, on the other hand, hit a purple patch during the last month-and-a-half and seemed unstoppable. He equalled Sachin’s record of most World Cup hundreds – six – in less than half the matches that the master blaster took. He also raised the bar by scoring five centuries in one World Cup – an unprecedented achievement.Bumrah came into this tournament as the best limited-overs bowler in the world. And he cemented his reputation even further by impeccable performances in almost all the matches. If it wasn’t for him, India may well have suffered a humiliating loss against Afghanistan. In death overs, the Gujarat pacer demonstrated again and again that he is unmatched when it comes to keeping runs down in the final overs. Jasprit Bumrah was brilliant for India.Robert Cianflone/Getty ImagesThe winners of the tournament, England, had four players in the side – opener Jason Roy, all-rounder Ben Stokes, middle-order batsman Joe Root and their new pace sensation Jofra Archer. Runners-up New Zealand were represented by their captain Kane Williamson, who was also given the honour of being the skipper of this side, and speedster Lockie Ferguson. The latter proved to be a major force in the middle overs with his wicket-taking prowess.The other losing semi-finalist Australia also had two of their players in the line-up – wicket-keeper batsman Alex Carey and Mitchell Starc, the leading wicket-taker in the tournament.Only one player from a team that didn’t play the semis qualified for the XI – Shakib Al-Hasan. The Bangladesh all-rounder had an incredible tournament were he scored over 600 runs and took 11 wickets.Interestingly, there were no spinners in the XI apart from Shakib. The four frontline bowlers were all pacers and all capable of bowling at over 150/kph. This is a testament to the big role played by genuine speed in the tournament.Team of the Tournament: Jason Roy, Rohit Sharma, Kane Williamson (C), Joe Root, Shakib Al-Hasan, Ben Stokes, Alex Carey (WK), Mitchell Starc, Jofra Archer, Lockie Ferguson, Jasprit Bumrahlast_img read more