Playboy is Up for Sale Sources Say

first_img The move comes in the midst of an identity crisis for the 62-year-old men’s lifestyle brand. Average circulation has slid from over three million in 2005 to just over 750,000 last year, according to the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM). The shift to a potential sale marks the continuation of a difficult few months for men’s magazines. 2015 saw the end of both Condé Nast’s Details and Bauer’s FHM, and Maxim has been in a state of near-constant flux since being purchased by entrepeneur Sardar Biglari in 2014. In October, Playboy announced the decision to cut nudity from its print edition, repeating a similar move it had made on its website that dropped the average age of its audience considerably and increased traffic by 400 percent. The Wall Street Journal reports that Playboy earned $38 million in revenue from media last year, and another $55 million through licensing agreements allowing third parties to use the brand’s recognizable bunny logo. The company also owns the famous Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles, which was put up for sale for $200 million last week.  The revamped print edition, featuring an increased trim size and heavier paper stock, debuted in March with a Snapchat-inspired cover—a not-so-subtle attempt at catching the eyes of male millennials. Just weeks after the debut of its revamped, nudity-free print edition, Playboy is up for sale. Investment bank Moelis & Co. is advising Playboy on the potential sale, according to WSJ. Citing people familiar with the situation, The Wall Street Journal reports today that Playboy Enterprises’ principle stakeholders, founder Hugh Hefner and private equity firm Rizvi Traverse Management, are exploring a sale that those same sources—who may or may not be within the company—speculate could bring in more than $500 million at auction. “You’re now one click away from every sex act imaginable for free,” Playboy CEO, Scott Flanders, who took over for Hefner’s daughter Christie in 2009, told the New York Times. “It’s just passé at this juncture.”last_img read more

VIDEO Watch The Back Track Band Perform A Concert On The Common

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Recreation Department’s 2019 Concerts on the Common series continued on Wednesday, July 24 with a performance from The BackTrack Band. BackTrack featured a wide selection of classic songs from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s.Wilmington Community Television was on hand to record the event. Watch the concert the below:—Video Playerhttps://s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/wilmington.castus-vod/vod/video/e4284e46-2b13-475f-a4c3-bab57e34cdcc/video.original.mp400:0000:0001:34:30Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Watch ‘Jimmy & The Jesters’ Perform A Concert On The CommonIn “Videos”Wilmington Concerts On The Common Series Continues With ‘BackTrack’ On July 24In “Community”VIDEO: Watch ‘Ball In The House’ Perform A Concert On The CommonIn “Videos”last_img read more

NASA telescope spies unusual galaxies from dawn of the universe

first_img Share your voice Spitzer’s deep-field view of the sky awash with galaxies. Circled in red are incredibly faint, distant galaxies that the telescope observed for over 200 hours.  NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/Spitzer/P. Oesch/S. De Barros/I.Labbe Astronomers surveying the sky with NASA’s Spitzer space telescope have been able to peer back to the early universe, 13 billion years in the past, and find some of the very first galaxies. They look like tiny, orange dots aglow in a sea of darkness — not too dissimilar to the famed first image of a black hole — but the miniscule lights imaged by Spitzer contain a host of young stars, composed mostly of hydrogen and helium. The discovery of these unexpectedly-bright galaxies could provide new clues about one of the most important cosmic events in history: the “Epoch of Reionization.”The new research, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society in April, required Spitzer to stare into the same region of sky for over 200 hours, studying the ancient cosmos as part of a campaign known as the GOODS Re-ionization Era wide-Area Treasury from Spitzer (GREATS). Another great, the Hubble Space Telescope, also contributed to the data. Post a comment More space news Tags NASA Space With Spitzer trained on a region of the sky for so long, it was able to gather light that had traveled across the universe to reach us. In what amounts to a cosmic staring contest, Spitzer didn’t blink. The telescope detected faint infrared signals from 135 distant galaxies, produced by high levels of ionizing radiation. It’s a particularly important finding, because ionizing radiation is believed to have contributed to the Epoch of Reionization in the early universe — a cosmic transformation that shaped the universe as we know it today. Astronomers are still stumped as to what exactly caused these changes, but the early galaxies detected by Spitzer may provide some clues.”Our latest Spitzer result reveals how different these early galaxies are to those at later times and pinpoints our sample as a key set for providing insights into how galaxies so efficiently reionized the universe,” said Garth Illingworth, a co-author on the new study. The results were surprising for Michael Werner, project scientist with Spitzer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.”We did not expect that Spitzer, with a mirror no larger than a Hula-Hoop, would be capable of seeing galaxies so close to the dawn of time,” he said in a statement. “But nature is full of surprises, and the unexpected brightness of these early galaxies, together with Spitzer’s superb performance, puts them within range of our small but powerful observatory.”  Spitzer, launched in 2003, is an infrared observatory in an Earth-trailing orbit operated by NASA and the California Institute of Technology. It carries three instruments that allow it to “see” across the wavelengths of infrared light, providing spectacular views of the gaseous, dusty distant cosmos.center_img Sci-Tech 0 Your wedding ring came from a neutron star explosion, 4.6 billion years ago Scientists just observed a crash between two neutron stars Gravitational wave detectors upgraded to hunt for ‘extreme cosmic events’ NASA Spitzer telescope celebrates 15 years of astounding images 15 Photoslast_img read more

3 city restaurants fined for unhygienic food

first_imgA Dhaka Metropolitan Police (DMP) mobile court led by its executive magistrate Moshiur Rahman has fined Tk 200,000 to three restaurants in city’s Farmgate area for preserving and selling unhygienic food items, reports news agency BSS.”Of the restaurants, Chandrima Restaurant and Mini Chinese was fined Tk 100,000, Kasturi Chayanir and Thai Chinese Restaurant and New Star Kebab were fined Tk 50 thousand each yesterday,” a DMP release said.The activities of DMP’s mobile courts against food adulteration, preserving and selling unhygienic foods throughout the capital in the holy month of Ramadan are being lauded by the city dwellers.DMP has promised to continue the activities of its mobile courts in this regard.last_img

16th amendment verdict shakes govt Khandker Mahbub

first_imgKhandker MahbubThe 16th amendment annulment verdict has shaken the government in such a way that Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) has considered this an opportunity to reap benefits out of it.BNP vice chairman and former president of the Supreme Court Bar Association (SCBA) Khandker Mahbub Hossain said this in an interview that came up in Prothom Alo print edition on Wednesday.Prothom Alo joint editor Mizanur Rahman Khan took the interview on the 16th amendment annulment verdict that scrapped parliament’s power to remove judges on the grounds of misconduct and incapacity.”I think that the observations made in the verdict are accurate and timely. The chief justice in his observations depicted a true picture of irregularities and injustice prevailing in society,” said Mahbub Hossain.When his attention was drawn to the observation made by justice Hasan Foez Siddique that Bangladesh lost its character as a sovereign and people’s republic during the autocratic rules of Ziaur Rahman and HM Ershad, the BNP leader said this observation has grieved them.”We are aggrieved at this observation. Ziaur Rahman had built friendly relations with the neighbouring country and taken all-out measures to protect the sovereignty. We are scrutinising the pros and cons of the verdict,” he said.Asked about the allegation of ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) that the BNP is using the verdict for its political goal, Mahbub said, “BNP is not doing politics centring on the verdict. Maybe, our party is trying to gain a political leverage from it.”He said, “The government is so shaken by the judgement that we see this as an opportunity.”Asked why the BNP is considering the verdict a historic one whereas it branded its founder Ziaur Rahman as a usurper, Mahbub said the independence of judiciary is the basic pillar of an independent democratic society and the 16th constitutional amendment was a big blow to the judiciary.Asked if the BNP would seek to expunge observations that go against Ziaur Rahman and the BNP, the party vice chairman said observations are the opinions of the judges. It will contain both good and bad. “I think BNP will take a decision after a thorough scrutiny of the verdict.”Mahbub Hossain went on to say, “The verdict accurately reflects the socio-political condition of the country. In which, it has been said in an oblique reference to Bangabandhu that no achievement can be made by a single person. And Zia’s name came in the observation by the way of talking about the martial law.”*The article is rewritten based on the interview by Rabiul Islamlast_img read more

ExGuatemalan soldier jailed gets 5160 yrs over civil war

first_imgA map of Guatemala. Photo: AFPA Guatemalan court on Wednesday sentenced a former soldier to 5,160 years in prison for the massacre of 201 peasants during one of the worst atrocities of the Central American nation’s civil war.The court found Santos Lopez “responsible as author” of 171 of the killings and sentenced him to 30 years for each, or 5,130 years in total.He received an additional 30 years linked to the killing of a surviving child, but the sentences are symbolic because Guatemala’s maximum prison term is 50 years.Lopez was a member of a US-trained counterinsurgency force called Kaibil. He was arrested in the United States and deported in 2016.According to the investigation, Lopez belonged to a patrol that committed the massacre in December 1982 in Dos Erres, on the border with Mexico. The soldiers were trying to recover about 20 rifles stolen by guerrillas during an earlier ambush which left 19 soldiers dead.The story of Dos Erres was told in the 2017 documentary “Finding Oscar,” executive-produced by Steven Spielberg, which recounts the search for another boy whose life was spared and who was then raised by one of the soldiers.A handful of other “Kaibiles” have been convicted, each receiving a sentence of more than 6,000 years in prison.Three others accused in the slaughter were jailed in the US for immigration violations. Several others are believed to reside in the United States.The massacre occurred during the rule of dictator Efrain Rios Montt, who himself was indicted on charges of genocide and died last April.Rios Montt allegedly ordered the murders of 1,771 indigenous Ixil-Maya people during his short reign in 1982-83, which came at the height of the 36-year civil war.According to the UN, about 200,000 people died or were made to disappear during Guatemala’s war, which ended in 1996.last_img read more

Rep Kahle votes to protect Michigan youth from dangers of ecigarettes

first_img State Rep. Bronna Kahle this week voted in favor of a plan to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and prevent individuals under 18 from possessing vaping products in Michigan.Kahle, of Adrian, said the number of teenagers who use e-cigarettes has increased dramatically over the past few years, prompting parents, teachers and law enforcement officers to reach out to her with concerns. In a recent study, one in five Michigan high school students reported having used an e-cigarette during the previous 30 days.“Vaping is becoming more and more popular among our teenagers, and I’m hearing that many have the misconception that it’s safe,” Kahle said. “It’s time we take action to reverse this alarming trend and get e-cigarettes out of children’s hands.”Electronic cigarettes are battery-operated devices that deliver nicotine and flavoring without burning tobacco. The devices are small and often look harmless – including a version that looks just like a computer flash drive – making them appealing to teens and difficult to detect in schools.According to the Centers for Disease Control, vaping nicotine can harm adolescent brain development and lead to addiction. Many vaping products also contain diacetyl, which is commonly associated with “popcorn lung” – a condition that damages airways.Senate Bills 106 and 155 received overwhelming support in the House and now head to the governor for consideration.### Categories: Kahle News 16May Rep. Kahle votes to protect Michigan youth from dangers of e-cigaretteslast_img read more