By Tanya DukesPrada Miuccia Prada is one of the be

first_imgBy Tanya DukesPrada Miuccia Prada is one of the best mix masters in fashion, so her most recent collection’s tour of 1940s suits and dresses, outdoorsy countryside chic and punky techno touches was oddly coherent coming from her. Weighty Shetland wool jackets were cinched at the waist over coordinating skirts with up-to-there slits. And a series of dresses in silk jacquard and leather packed a strong, womanly punch. Prada also takes the prize for the most offbeat accessories of the season, including fringed, studded, cracked leather pumps and thigh-high leather waders (no word yet on whether those will actually be waterproof).Dolce & Gabbana Anyone starved for a celebrity presence at Milan’s ready-to-wear shows would find satisfaction at the Dolce & Gabbana show. Freida Pinto, Eva Mendes and Scarlett Johansson brought big screen elegance to a season devoid of A-list lovelies. The designers took their cues from another larger than life inspiration, Elsa Schiaparelli, for their surreal collection of exaggerated silhouettes with flashes of her signature hot pink. The puffed up shoulders the pair favored in their spring collection remain in a revamped, tapered form on dresses that have a spare-no-expense exuberance that had been sorely lacking elsewhere. And their classic corsets showed up in shapely lace dresses.Giuliana Teso It’s hard to imagine any option that’s not available in Giuliana Teso’ encyclopedic inventory of spectacular furs. In particular, the fall collection brimmed with cropped jackets with youthful details like oversized buttons and horizontal panels joined by contrasting stitching. A first from the company is its ski collection. To ensure that the luxe garments could actually perform on the slopes, Guiliana Teso teamed with a performance ski brand that provided high-tech cushioning material to protect vulnerable pressure points and diffuse the force of a fall. In case of a less-than-graceful landing, you’ll look and feel better in Giuliana Teso.Etro You can always count on Etro to inject a flash of the exotic that makes classic, wearable design gloriously covetable. Spicy, shades, block prints, gypsy fringes and glitzy gold python turned straightforward separates and dresses into show pieces. The collection followed the prevailing mix of cropped pants and dresses and skirts that hovered about the knees. Diaphanous silk evening dresses in scrolling lines and paisley reestablished Etro’s place as the preeminent purveyor of luxe bohemian glamour.last_img read more

Higher BMI in people with prediabetes related to evening preference and lack

first_imgAug 15 2018People with prediabetes who go to bed later, eat meals later and are more active and alert later in the day -; those who have an “evening preference” -; have higher body mass indices compared with people with prediabetes who do things earlier in the day, or exhibit morning preference. The higher BMI among people with evening preference is related to their lack of sufficient sleep, according to a University of Illinois at Chicago-led study.The results of the study -; which looked at Asian participants and was led by Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism in the UIC College of Medicine -; are published in the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology.Prediabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be Type 2 diabetes. Without modifications to diet and exercise, patients with prediabetes have a very high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.Lack of sufficient sleep has been previously linked to an increased risk for numerous health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. Evening preference has also been linked to higher weight and higher risk for diabetes.Reutrakul and her colleagues wanted to investigate the relationship between morning/evening preference and BMI -; a measure of body fat in relation to height and weight -; among people with prediabetes.”Diabetes is such a widespread disease with such an impact on quality of life, that identifying new lifestyle factors that might play into its development can help us advise patients with an early stage of the disease on things they can do to turn it around and prevent prediabetes from becoming full-blown diabetes,” said Reutrakul.Related StoriesHigh sleep variability and short sleep duration predict blunted weight lossMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsPink noise enhances deep sleep for people with mild cognitive impairmentA total of 2,133 participants with prediabetes enrolled in the study. Their morning/evening preference was assessed through a questionnaire.Participants who scored high in “morningness” answered questions indicating that they preferred to wake up earlier, have activities earlier, and felt more alert earlier in the day compared with those who scored high on “eveningness.” Sleep duration and timing were obtained using a questionnaire and the extent of social jet lag was evaluated for each participant. Social jet lag reflects a shift in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends. Greater social jetlag (e.g., larger shift in sleep timing) has previously been shown to be associated with higher BMI in some populations. The average age of the participants was 64 years old, and the average BMI was 25.8 kilograms per meter squared. Average sleep duration was about seven hours per night.The researchers found that for participants younger than 60 years of age, higher levels of social jet lag were associated with a higher BMI. Among participants older than 60 years old, those with more evening preference had higher BMIs and this effect was partly due to having insufficient sleep but not social jet lag. Evening preference was directly associated with higher BMI in this group.”Timing and duration of sleep are potentially modifiable,” said Reutrakul. “People can have more regular bedtimes and aim to have more sleep, which may help reduce BMI and the potential development of diabetes in this high-risk group.”​Source: https://today.uic.edu/evening-preference-lack-of-sleep-associated-with-higher-bmi-in-people-with-prediabeteslast_img read more